Where Are My Children

1
                             Mr. Tyrone Power

                                  - in -

                           Where Are My Children


           Copyrighted 1916
The Universal Film Manufacturing Company      All rights reserved

2
  From the story by
L. Payton and F. Hall

3
   Written and Produced by
Lois Weber and Phillips Smalley

4
The question of birth control is now being gener-
ally discussed. All intelligent people know that
birth control is a subject of serious public interest.
Newspapers, magazines and books have treated
different phases of this question. Can a subject
thus dealt with on the printed page be denied
careful dramatization on the motion picture 
screen? The Universal Film Mfg. Company
believes not.

5
The Universal Film Mfg. Company does believe,
however, that the question of birth control should
not be presented before children. In producing
this picture the intention is to place a serious 
drama before adult audiences, to whom no sug-
gestion of a fact of which they are ignorant is
conveyed. It believes that children should not be
admitted to see this picture unaccompanied by 
adults, but if you bring them it will do them an 
immeasurable amount of good.

6
Behind the great portals of Eter-
nity, the souls of little children 
       waited to be born.

7
Within the first space was the
great army of "chance" children.
They went forth to earth in vast
           numbers.

8
Then came those sad, "un-
wanted" souls, that were con-
stantly sent back. They were
marked morally or physically de-
fective and bore the sign of the 
          serpent.

9
And then in the secret place of
the Most High were those souls,
fine and strong, that were sent 
forth only on prayer. They were
marked with the approval of the 
           Almighty.

10
Richard Walton, the District
Attorney, was a great believer 
in eugenics.
               Mr. Tyrone Power

11
"These poor souls are ill-born. If
the mystery of birth were under-
stood, crime would be wiped out."

12
It was a great disappointment to 
the District Attorney that his 
      wife was childless.

13
Never dreaming that it was her 
fault, her husband concealed his 
        disappointment.

14
The visits of his sister were a
 source of pleasure to Walton.

15
Walton's sister had contracted
an eugenic marriage and her first
  child was a source of great 
           interest.

16
About this time a case came to
trial that greatly interested the
       District Attorney.

17
"I am accused of distributing
indecent literature because I
advocate birth regulation. The
 law should help instead of 
        hinder me."

18
"My work among the poor often
   takes me to the slums."

19
"These conditions prove to me 
the necessity of world-wide en-
lightenment on the subject of 
        birth control."

20
Mrs. William Carlo is Mrs. 
  Walton's best friend.

21
"You must all arrange to come
to my house party next month."

22
"If you are determined to evade
motherhood, and are willing to
take the risk, I would suggest
  that you see Dr. Malfit."

23
A jury of men disagreed with
     Dr. Homer's views.

24
"Doctor, my friend desires to
consult with you privately con-
  cerning a serious ailment."

25
One of the "unwanted" ones
returns, and a social butterfly is
again ready for house parties.

26
"We plan to have half a dozen
of these little angels in time."

27
It happened that Mrs. Walton's
brother came to visit her when
 the housekeeper's daughter
    arrived from school.

28
"Will you allow my daughter to 
stop with me until I can find a 
        place for her?"

29
Walton came to enjoy the sight
of this bright young creature
      about the place.

30
"You are the loveliest thing I
have ever seen! I idolize you!"

31
Practice teaches men of this class
the bold methods that sweep in-
experienced girls off their feet.

32
It was the old, old tragedy, and
one of the "unwanted" ones was
       called to earth.

33
A month later.

34
The wages of sin.

35
Seeing how much children mean 
to her husband, and really loving
him, Mrs. Walton decides to con-
quer her selfishness and to pre-
     pare for motherhood.

36
Some time later.

37
"A friend of mine is in trouble."

38
This time the obliging Dr. Malfit
           bungled.

39
The wolf and the lamb.

40*
Lillian lived long enough 
to tell her broken-hearted 
    mother the truth.

41*
The dancing feet are stilled:
"Dust to dust - Ashes to Ashes."

42*
Through Walton's efforts
 Dr. Malfit was quickly
    brought to trial.

43
"Aren't you a little hard on Dr. 
Malfit, Richard? He was not the 
     only one at fault."

44
Dr. Malfit's trial was a short one.
He was not permitted to bring 
his books or the names of other 
   patients into the case.

45
"The sentence of this court is
that you be confined in the peni-
tentiary at hard labor for the 
   term of fifteen years."

46
"Before siting in judgment on
others, you should see to your 
        own household."

47
"I have just learned why so many 
of you have no children. I should 
bring you to trial for manslaughter, 
but I shall content myself with 
asking you to leave my house!"

48
"Where are my children?"

49
"I--an officer of the law--must
     shield a murderess!"

50
All night long, Richard Walton
grieved for his lost children and
his lost faith in the woman who
 should have been their mother.

51
Prayerfully now Mrs. Walton
sought the blessing she had
refused, but, having perverted
Nature so often, she found her-
self physically unable to wear
  the diadem of motherhood.

52
Throughout the years she must
face the silent question--"Where
      are my children?"

Finis

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