The Soul of Youth

1
Throughout all the ages,
 Good has sought the light
of day and Evil the darkness
of night. Under cover of this 
darkness, a bargain is being 
made - a bargain so monstrous
       and unnatural that it must needs
       be consummated where
       God's light is wanting.

2
It is traffic in a human
 soul - a woman, who
pray God there be no
more like, has offered
for sale her unborn child.
Think of it, - a helpless, little
baby, before its eyes have
opened on the world, labelled
"unwanted" and sold!

3
  "Supposing I do buy 
it - what about your 
husband?"

4
  "He's dead. Oh you'll
get the baby all right -
I don't care what happens
to it."

5
  "Gee, Pete will be back
from his trip just in time,
and when I tell him the 
brat's his --"

6
Another dark night and
 the time has come for
fulfilling the bargain.

7
  "Say - is it a boy
or a girl?"

8
  "I don't know. I 
never asked."

9
  "You fixed it so they'll 
give it to me?"

10
  "You mean she's
goin' to croak?"

11
  "A boy! I'll name it
after Pete. That ought 
to cinch things!"

12
Elaborate preparations
 are made - and then Pete
is sent for, to see his "son".

13
Pete Morano, ward
 politician and Maggie's
source of supply.

14
  "Pete - his nose! See
- it's just like yours."

15
"Nose like mine, eh?"

16
  "Put up a job like that on 
Pete Morano, would you, you 
devil! I saw you last night,
coming down the steps of 
the hospital."

17
  "Get that squalling 
brat out of here!"

18
  "Now you get to hell
out of here! I'm through
with you!"

19
  "We've never been as 
crowded as this. I don't
really know where we'd 
put another one."

20
So, the poor unwanted baby
 is brought up in an orphans'
home for boys. If being an
orphan meant only growing up
without parents, it wouldn't be
so bad, but too often it means
growing up without love.

21
They have named the boy
 Ed Simpson, and at the age
of fourteen his reputation is
the worst in the institution.
What chance has a boy, when
everyone thinks he's bad!

22
Mrs. Joye, the matron
 - one of those sad,
incapable persons who could
not possibly manage anything,
much less a boy.

23
  "Late again, Ed Simpson!
Well, you can just go with-
out your breakfast now and
get right to work."

24
  "He's been eating the 
cheese out of the mouse 
trap again. No wonder
we're overrun with mice!"

25
  "Hey, Ed, give us
a sinker!"

26
  "We got 'em off'n Ed
Simpson. He's handin'
'em out to all the kids."

27
  "Give me that apron!
You just can't be trusted 
to do a darned thing."

28
While Ed has been growing up, Pete
 Morano, the man who, but for the 
merest chance, little Ed would have 
called "Father." has climbed step by
step, or rather graft by graft, until
now he is running for Mayor.

29
  "We'd have a cinch if 
it wasn't for that guy 
Hamilton - he's about got 
your number, Pete."

30
Robert Hamilton, the man
 who, in his effort for a
clean civic government, is 
leading the fight to defeat
Morano.

31
His wife, one of those
 women whose viewpoint
is no wider than her own 
front door.

32
  "Frederick Armstrong, with
all his millions, refuses to
contribute a cent to the
campaign. I'd give a good
deal to know if he's backing 
Morano."

33
Ruth, the most important
 member of the Hamilton
family.

34
Mr. Hamilton's sister
 Vera, just home from
boarding school.

35
Dick Armstrong, only son
 of the man who has just
incurred Mr. Hamilton's 
displeasure.

36
The people next door
 are also discussing
the political situation.

37
Samuel Hodge,
 Hamilton's partner.

38
His wife, Beatrice.

39
  "People don't seem to realize
what it would mean to this 
town if Morano should be 
elected. Why, he -"

40
  "Sam dear, I wish you'd 
go look at Babe. I'm afraid
she's uncovered - she's
been so restless all day."

41
  "Little sister, I don't like
to see you going about with
Dick Armstrong. The boy's
never done anything but
spend his father's money,
and as for his father - "

42
  "If you must have something 
to fuss over, why don't you 
adopt a child and put that cat
outdoors where it belongs?"

43
On the day that Mr. Hodge
 finally relegates "Babe"
to the back yard, Mrs.
Hodge sets forth with
Vera to find a
substitute.

44
  "No! I'm afraid they'd
never take Babe's place."

45
  "Have all the boys 
brought in."

46
"But I left 'Rastus in -"

47
"But 'Rastus -"

48
  "But I want a beautiful
cherub with blue eyes
and golden curls."

49
  "Everybody wants that kind,
but there ain't many cherubs 
brought to orphans' homes."

50
  "Hadn't you better take 
that soap away from 
him? It looks fearfully 
indigestible."

51
  "It's no use! Some days
he swallows everything he
gets hold of. This is one of
his swallowing days."

52
"But I got to -"

53
  "Oh, Lord, if you cain't
shet dat water off, won't
you please send some-
one dat kin?"

54
  "I'm sorry, but he's
spoken for."

55
"Then I won't take any."

56
  "What's the matter, boy?
Doesn't anyone love you?"

57
  "Don't waste your time on 
him, Miss. He's the worst 
boy in the place."

58
  "My brother says any boy
will make good if he gets a
chance."

59
  "She asked me if there
didn't nobody love me.
What does she mean -
love?"

60
  "Oh, that's what they preach 
about in sermons. That ain't
got nothin' to do with us."

61
One day a new orphan
 arrives - protesting
at every step.

62
A boy who has been
 the under-dog all his
life knows how it feels.

63 [animated title]
"Atta-boy, Ed!"

[the following lines appear consecutively, 
 circling the above line clockwise]

"Soak 'im, Shorty!"

"Chew his ear!"

"Muss 'im up!"

"Knock his block off!"

64
So, for the first time,
 love enters Ed's life.

65
The only sanctuary
 Ed knows.

66
This wonderful treasure
 must have a name. Ed
decides to share his last name,
Simpson, with the dog - his
name shall be Simp.

67
Thereafter Ed's heart
 glows with the feeling
that he owns something -
         something which is
         dependent on him and
         which licks his hand.

68
  "Oh, Simp, I wouldn't
trade you for nothin' -
not nothin' a-tall!"

69
Then for a week
 Ed is almost happy.

70
"ED!"

71

"H-E-L-P-"

72
  "There's a great big man 
in the cellar - and he
started after me with a
knife and was going to cut 
my heart right out!"

73
  "Of course, I might have
known it would be you -
you scalawag!"

74
That night, when most of
 the orphans are asleep.

75
The Mecca of the
 homeless - the streets.

76
  "Gee, kid, that wuz
great! I bet you upset
his breakfust all right,
all right!"

77
  "Yuh wanta watch out for 
that bird now! When a cop
gets down on yuh, what
he can do to yuh - say!"

78
  "We know how rotten Morano
is, but the voters don't, and it
seems impossible to get any-
thing on him."

79
  "Say, ain't that fierce!
An' yuh ain't got no place 
to sleep?"

80
  "Say, come back when I 
get my papers sold, an' I'll 
take yuh to my home."

81
  "I'm sorry, Simp,
but if she's going to
cry about it -"

82
  "Oo-oh! Mama, he must
have swallowed the dish 
and all - and he'll die - "

83
  "Aren't you ashamed,
you dirty boy - taking a 
poor, little, hungry puppy's
dinner? Don't you know
that's stealing?"

84
  "Hungry! Gee! With a
belly on him like that, he
ain't got no right to be
hungry!"

85
Mike's "home".

86
  "You're too big to sell papers,
Ed. They always buy from the 
little guys. Yuh could shine
shoes, though, and we can shut 
Simp up here."

87
  "We got a good place to
sleep, and we kin pick up
enough to eat - that is, if
the cops don't catch us."

88
The poor victim of
 prenatal influence and
unloved childhood quickly
learns the philosophy of
the streets, and after a
few weeks -

89
  "Save time, boss. Shine
your shoes while your
shuvver's changin' tires."

90
  "No, I ain't never
saw you before."

91
  "Let the boy alone, Jones.
He's trying to make an 
honest living."

92
  "I've been thinking it 
over, Vera, and your brother 
is right. I'm going to get
a job somewhere."

93
Meantime, Morano gets
 an unpleasant reminder
of other days.

94
"Six dollars! Gee whiz!"

95
Everyone has
 his own idea
of Heaven.

96
Nearing the end
 of a hard fight.

97
  "Dad's finally given in,
Vera, and I'm going to 
start to work in his mines."

98
  "We must send someone who
is not known to be associated
with us in any way. It's a
darned important proposition."

99
"Dick! Send him!"

100
  "I know you could trust 
him - he - I - "

101
  "Armstrong's son - great
idea! Nobody would ever 
suspect him."

102
"The day I found this -"

103
  "I looked in the window
and they wuz whole rows of
jams and cakes and things
- jest like a store."

104
While Dick is on his
 way to San Francisco,
Hamilton puts in long hours
in his office.

105
  "I don't feel confident about
young Armstrong's getting 
those papers somehow - I'm
afraid."

106
  "There are burglars
in the house."

107
"Beat it, Mike!"

108
  "He's a hard case, ma'am.
I've got several things on 
him."

109
  "He looks like a bad 
boy - I've seen him 
around here before."

110
  "So it was only a boy!
Somehow I don't like to 
think of putting a youngster
in jail. I wish I had been
home."

111
Judge Lindsey's Juvenile Court,
 which is famous the world
over. In this court, it isn't Judge
and Criminal - it's Man and Boy.

112
Judge Ben B. Lindsey, who is
 known as the "Little Judge"
and who is universally loved
and respected for his wonderful
work in "the cause of boy."

113
The first case is that of three
 boys accused of breaking
and entering a freight
car. They have flatly
denied the accusation.

114
His years of experience
 with boys enable him to
choose unerringly the right
boy to question.

115
  "That's a good hand, Tony.
It's the hand of a boy who 
is not afraid - you're not 
afraid, are you, Tony?"

116
  "I thought not. It's usually
when boys are afraid that
they don't tell the truth."

117
  "You broke into the freight 
car, Tony, because you thought 
it contained watermelons. Did
you find any?"

118
  "No, sir, but there
was a lot of cases
with somethin' about
figs on 'em."

119
  "Sirup o' figs. I drank a
whole bottle full, and gee, 
Judge! don't you think I've
suffered enough?"

120
Judge: "You boys are not afraid 
     now, are you? Pete, you 
     helped Tony break the seal, 
     didn't you?"
Pete: "I helped him, and Joe
     jiggered for us."

121
  "If I let you go this time, can
I promise the superintendent
you won't go near the railroad 
yards again?"

122
  "I promise you that these
boys won't go near your
yards again."

123
  "Boys, if you go back to
the yards again, you'll be
making a liar of the
judge. You wouldn't want
to do that, would you?"

124
  "So you stole twenty-five
cents? Now, tell me why
you did it."

125
  "I wanted to buy some 
flowers for my mama."

126
  "I thought they'd make
her happy - she cries all
the time."

127
  "She's been cryin' ever
since Father went away."

128
  "Go home to your mother,
son, and do your best to 
make her happy - but don't
steal to do it."

129
  "You say this boy
threatened your life?"

130
  "A squirt gun! It doesn't
look very dangerous."

131
  "Where did you get
this, my boy?"

132
  "I found it in a 
garbage can."

133
  "You have no father and
no mother and no home -"

134
  "'Scuse me, Judge, but
I got a home."

135
  "That isn't a real home,
my boy, so I'm afraid
you'll have to go to the
reform school!"

136
  "Please - please, Mr. Judge,
don't send him to the reform 
school!"

137
  "I feel that what boys
really need is a home 
and a mother."

138
  "Daddy'll give him a
home, and I'll be a
mother to him."

139
  "The reform school of today is
really a training school, where
boys are helped to be good
citizens, instead of dangerous 
criminals."

140
  "But you think he stands 
a better chance in a real
home? Suppose I offer
him one?"

141
  "The kind of man this 
boy will make depends on 
his surroundings. It's up 
to us, dear."

142
  "If I let you go home
with Mr. Hamilton, will
you promise me never 
to steal again?"

143
  "Hamilton thinks he's clever
to have sent Armstrong's boy,
but I'll show him."

144
Late that night Mike
 has a happy thought -

145
After a night in
 his new home.

146
The Orphans' Home had
 never been strong on
table etiquette.

147
  "Bob, it's a wonderful
theory, but it won't work.
We can't have a boy like 
that in the house."

148
  "Let him stay for awhile, 
Mary. I would like to feel
that I'd given some boy 
a lift."

149
  "I'll ask Mama to let
you keep him - I think
he has lovely eyes."

150
Waiting for the
 seven-thirty train.

151
Dick's complacency 
 is doomed to be 
short lived.

152
  "Why, Dick, it must have
been done while you were
talking with Morano."

153
  "I suppose Morano has 
the papers by now."

154
  "I was a fool to trust you.
I might have known you'd 
make a mess of it."

155
  "Are you crying because 
that guy lost the papers?"

156
  "Yes, and because I love 
him - and now we can't 
get married."

157
His head filled with a 
 desperate scheme, Ed
goes back to his old clothes
and his old haunts.

158
  "Wait, gimme a nickel
- I gotta phone."

159
  "Say, Judge, I wanta take
back that promise. I gotta
steal somethin', an' I thought
it would be honester to tell
you about it first."

160
Later, and by slow 
 and painful stages.

161
  "Here, take 'em. Vera
cried, an' I can't stand
women cryin'. So - so,
now you can make -
good - "

162
  "Ain't yuh gon'ta help
him, mister? He helped 
you."

163
  "Watch him for a moment,
while I phone for the doctor."

164
Early the next morning.

165
  "Good work! Now we
have Morano just where 
we want him."

166
  "Now look here, Morano! You'll
drop the fight and clear out of
town, or I'll have these papers 
published."

167
  "Bob, I can't find Ed
anywhere. His room
hasn't been occupied."

168
  "There is the real hero.
He got the papers for me,
and was hurt doing it."

169
  "I'm not going to look for 
a blue-eyed cherub any
longer. I'm going to adopt
Ed! I'd like to be a mother
to a boy like Ed."

170
"Ed already has a mother!"

171
"I gotta phone the Judge."

172
  "I stole 'em, Judge, what
I told you about, but I
want to make you another 
promise. I'm not going to
steal nothin' again - never!"

173
  "Oh, an' say, Judge -
I got a mother!"

174
  "One more boy is to have
a chance. The hope of this
country is its boys - its men
of tomorrow."

175
The End.


Home