Sex

1
The Frivolity,
New York's gayest
Midnight Frolic.

2
The Spider Dance -
the sensation of 
  the season.

3 [final line fades in after a moment]
The Star -
Adrienne
 Renault -
  Louise Glaum.

4
Philip Overman,
her most ardent
   admirer.

5 [final line fades in after a moment]
His wife, 
spending the 
evening alone,
  as usual.

6
"The kid's grabbed 
 off a mash note
 and she's scared
     stiff."

7
"The kid" -- Daisy
 Henderson, recently
 of "Cobb Corners",
 and still dazed by
 the fact that she
 is now a member
 of the Frivolity 
  beauty squad.

8
"But he's 
 married."

9
"You should fret,
 as long as he's
 not married to
     you."

10
"That's the woman
 who's keeping your
 husband away from
 home, Mrs. Overman.
 She's the big feature
 at The Frivolity."

11
"Do you want
 any more dope
   on 'em?"

12
"You only live
 once, kid. Grab
 everything you can
 get and never
 feel sorry for any-
 one but yourself."

13
"The kid's coming
 to our party
 tonight -- She
 needs cheering up."

14
"Don't get interest-
 ed in the male
 fly-by-nights who
 are here. They
 are not worth
 bothering about."

15
"The kid will stay
 here tonight."

16
"And have you
 been working
 again tonight?"

17
"Not exactly work-
 ing -- but busi-
  ness matters."

18 [lines and image fade in and out]
The breakfast hour -
 of "the famous" -

[image of timepiece at two o'clock]

in the afternoon.

19
"Miss Renault?"

20
"I am Mrs. Philip
 Overman - I came
 to talk to you
 about my husband."

21
"Are you in
 love with my 
  husband?"

22
"Are you?"

23
"I came here to
 appeal to your
 decency - Now I
 realize my mis-
     take."

24
"That's right. Let's
 tell each other
 the truth - It's
 my turn now -"

25
"Your husband's
 tired of you
 and you're trying
 to blame it
   on me."

26
"You haven't been
 robbed - You've
 merely lost some-
      thing -

27
-I've found it 
 and I intend
 to keep it."

28
"And your sense
 of fair play?"

29
"That's a luxury
 I can't afford."

30
"There's no use
 stalling, Phil -
   she's wise."

31
"So you've been
 spying on me!"

32
"And now?"

33
"I intend to
 divorce you."

34
"Don't look so
 moth-eaten --
 You ought to 
 be glad she
 didn't shoot up
   the place."

35
   EVENING.
And a lively
curiosity which
has supplanted
    fear.

36
"I'm dying to
 know how you
 came out this
  afternoon!"

37
"Fine."

38
"Nothing hap-
 pened to you?"

39
"Listen, kid - we 
 women are always
 battling over men -
 We take it as 
 a matter of course."

40
"And when we fall
 for the other
 woman's hard-luck
 story, we're just
 being damn fools.
   Understand?"

41
Along the High-
road of Surfeited
Folly, where each
Milestone marks
the burial place
of a wasted month.

42
  "Divorced" -
but finding no
great satisfaction
  in the fact.

43
A pupil of
unusual promise.

44
"I think he's
    cute."

45
"It's a loving cup
 presented to me 
 for being the
 biggest fool in
   the world."

46
"That's Dick Wallace,
 of Pittsburg. He
 came on with the
 idea of buying New
 York and taking
 it back home with
       him."

47
"He's got the
 money to do it,
    at that."

48
"Ask him to
 come over."

49
"I've seen a
 great deal of
 you. I watched
 your dance last
    night."

50
"I'm really a
 very miserable
 man -- nobody
   loves me."

51
"I'd hate to
 see you die
 of loneliness."

52
The antidote for
loneliness - the
sixth treatment.

53
"It's too bad
 you're in love
 with someone
     else."

54
"Why?"

55
"Otherwise I
 might get ex-
 cited and marry
     you."

56
"I don't think
 I'd marry the
 best man on
    earth."

57
"Fine. That
 gives me a
  chance."

58
"Naughty, naughty!
 Remember we're
 not even engaged."

59
"You are wonderful-
 And I'm on the
 square about that
 marriage thing if
 you'd take a
     chance."

60
"I was just say-
 ing goodbye when
    you rang."

61
"You are rather
 serious aren't
     you?"

62
"Has it ever
 occurred to you
 that I might
    marry?"

63
"Why - I suppose
 everyone marries."

64
"Phil - do - do you
 ever think of
 marrying again?"

65
"Don't be afraid!
 I don't mean that
 I want you to
   marry me."

66
"How about it?
 Honeymoon
 abroad - Naples -

67
- Venice -

68
- and everything."

69
"Let's be honest, 
    for once."

70
"As an added
 attraction, I fitted
 in all right but
 as your wife -
 we'd make a
 sad mess of it."

71
"But I am
 thinking of
  marrying."

72
"Dick Wallace?"

73
"Why not? He's
 rich as sin and
 I'm fond of him -
 I might even love
   him some day."

74
"Do you mean that
 you wish me to
 gracefully bow out?"

75
"You'll be much
 better off -

76
- besides you ought
  to consider my
    happiness."

77
"Good luck."

78
Time, the inscrutable -
who patiently creates
that he may as
patiently destroy.

[dissolves to:]

79
New York City -
two years later.

80
The victim of her
own boomerang -
intensely in love
with her husband.

81
A love that has
brought about her
voluntary withdrawal
from the stage,
and aroused within
her the instinct of
the nest-builder.

82
"Well, I'll have
 to be going, dear.
 I'll be back as 
 soon as possible."

83
Daisy Henderson,
formerly of
Cobb Corners -

[dissolves to:]

84
Daisy Henderson,
now the finished
   product.

85
The Vigil, so
dreaded by all 
    women.

86
The awakening.

87
"I wonder what has
 become of Daisy
   Henderson?"

88
"I suppose she's
 working at one
 of the theatres."

89
"It's funny we
 haven't run across 
       her."

90
"Yes, it is funny
    isn't it?"

91
The box office
at the Frivolity
   Theatre.

92
"I've lost Miss
 Henderson's address.
 Will you please
  give it to me?"

93
"Surely you haven't 
 forgotten me -
 Adrienne Renault?"

94
"I'm awfully
 glad to see
  you again."

95
Her former 
apartment.

96
"My dear! Fancy
  seeing you!"

97
"I imagine you 
 could fancy more
 agreeable things."

98
"My husband brought
 this home about
 three o'clock this
     morning."

99
"Dick did?"

100
"Listen to me!
 Dick is mine!"

101
"Why dearie! How
 can you speak  
 that way to me?"

102
"He's my husband!"

103
"What of it?"

104
"Just this - You
   keep off!"

105
"You didn't feel
 that way about
 husbands in the
   old days."

106
"Does that mean 
 that you're not
 going to let
  Dick alone?"

107
"Why should I?
 He's got a wad
 of money and
 he's a great
 help to me."

108
"Don't act!"

109
"Dick's not the
 sticking kind,
 but as long as
 he does stick
 I'm not the girl
 to discourage 
      him."

110
 "Hello,
sweetheart."

111
"You Cad!"

112
"You've got an
 awful nerve 
 spying on me!
 I hope you got 
  an eyeful!"

113
"That's what
 I'm asking for -
 another chance."

114
"Oh! Why should
 this have to
 happen to me?"

115
"I love you -
 I have always
 loved you - won't
 you believe it?"

116
"I would like
    to --"

117
Time, the inscrutable -
who patiently creates
that he may as
patiently destroy.

118
"After this 
 demonstration
 I'm through!"

119
"You can't
 mean that!
 You wouldn't
 turn against
 your own wife!"

120
"You can't bully
 me! You can't
 make me live
  with you!"

121
"That's true."

122
"Mr. Wallace told
 me to tell you
 he had taken his
 things to the
     Club."

123
The first in-
stinct of the
beaten and crush-
ed - to crawl
away and hide.

124
On the Blue
Star Liner,
Gothic, in the
star-sprinkled
dusk of the
first evening
   at sea.

125
Their second
 honeymoon.

126
"They are danc-
 ing in the main
 salon -- Everyone
 seems so happy -
 Wouldn't Madame 
 care to join 
    them?"

127
The standards of 
morality eternally
demand that the
naked soul of
Sex be stripped
of its falsehoods -
which can only be
atoned for through
  bitter tears.

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