Scaramouche

1   
The reign of Louis XVI,
 King of France, marked
the passing of the French
Monarchy. Bankrupt, abandoned
to the rule of an all-powerful
Nobility and an indifferent
 Clergy, the nation faced
 starvation - or revolt.

2
Our story starts in the
provinces, in the wooded
valley of Gavrillac, with
its nestling village and
    gloomy château.

3
Gavrillac's inn and
   posting-house.

4
"Take warning - this is what
is in store for all who
poach upon the preserves
of the Marquis de La Tour!"

5
André-Louis Moreau -
 returning now after
two years of law school
in Paris - had been born
with the gift of laughter
and a sense that the world 
        was mad.

6
Philippe de Vilmorin,
student for the priest-
hood - from childhood
André's closest friend.

7
"God comfort your poor
         heart."

8
The great Marquis
   de La Tour d'Azyr
whose vast domains adjoined
the township of Gavrillac.

9
"God and King and Humanity
defied - by order of the
  Marquis de La Tour!"

10
"You speak of me,
    Monsieur!"

11
"I speak, Monsieur le Marquis,
of one who uses his great
rank and power to inflict
unspeakable horror on those
       beneath him."

12
"If Monsieur is unarmed, the
sword of the Chevalier de
Chabrillane is at his disposal!"

13
"He is a student of divinity,
  Monsieur - - he knows
  nothing of the sword."

14
The Field of Honor.

15
"But you have killed 
        him!"

16
"Of course, he had a too
dangerous gift of eloquence."

17
"Come back, assassin, and
make yourself quite safe
  by killing me too!"

18
"Oh, let him come, Monsieur!
  Let him complete his 
     coward's work!"

19
"It was your eloquence he
feared, Philippe; but he has
     not silenced it."

20
 "Your voice shall be mine;
  your gospel of freedom
    mine - to hound him
relentlessly until justice is
          done!"

21
For generations the
   old château upon
the hill had sheltered
the lords of Gavrillac.

22
Here, to his godfather,
Quintin de Kercadiou,
André-Louis now turned
 for advice and aid.

23
The return of Aline de
 Kercadiou had brought
to the drowsy gardens of
Gavrillac a touch of romance,
of the studied coquetry of
   far-off Versailles.

24
"Justice against the 
  Marquis? You are
        mad!"

25
"Two men, human beings,
have been slain in cold
blood, by his order and
     by his hand!"

26
"Mademoiselle, I have
Monsieur your uncle's
permission to wait upon
you tomorrow evening."

27
"You see - for Aline's sake,
the Marquis must not be
antagonized. I have great 
          hopes."

28
"Monsieur, two years ago
when Aline left for the
Versailles Court, I too,
 had great hopes - -"

29
"I shall love you always,
     André - always."

30
"- - for I go to seek 
justice in a world where 
      none exists!"

31
"It is nothing. Paris
has filled him with
revolutionary ideas.
Put him from your 
       mind."

32
"After a long night's 
  ride - that brought
André-Louis to the town
     of Rennes."

33
Inflamed by the oratory
  of a small but eloquent
group of students, Rennes
had become a center of the
  movement for freedom.

34
"Liberty and equality must
     be established!"

35
The King's Lieutenant,
 presiding power in
the Palace of Justice
      at Rennes.

36
"Your business concerns
those howling dogs out 
        there?"

37
   It seemed that
Philippe's eloquence
had indeed become the
heritage of André-Louis.

38
"Who - who - is this
      criminal?"

39
"What insolence! To accuse
 the Marquis de La Tour!"

40
 "Monsieur, I had pictured
Justice as blind, but beautiful.
Today I find that Justice is
not blind - - not to rank
       and wealth -"

41
"- and as for beauty - if
Monsieur will but glance 
      to his left -"

42
"Arrest that man!"

43
"Citizens, I bring you hope!
This decree, accepted by
the King, abolishes the right
of Nobility to rule by force,
to perpetuate such outrages
         as this!"

44
"Turn out the dragoons and
  bring me that Gavrillac
  lawyer, dead or alive!"

45
"There is a traitor in the
Palace of Justice who defies
    the King's decree!"

46
"Beware! The dragoons!"

47
"My name is Chapelier.
I like your courage."

48
Evening brought to
  Gavrillac a mood
of witchery and magic.

49
"Have you the music 
of that new minuet
   'Papillons'?"

50
"I must have left
'Papillons' in my
       room."

51
"By Heaven, Aline, you
shall never marry him!"

52
"The dragoons!"

53
"I am desolated, but I can
do nothing, Mademoiselle.
He holds the King's warrant."

54
Morning -
 and a fugitive.

55
"Oh, Monsieur, you have
  ruined everything!"

56
Strolling players, -
   nomads of the
theatre, managing to
wring a precarious
living from the smaller
  provincial towns.

57
"Death of my life! I will
teach you it is no laughing
   matter to interrupt a
rehearsal of Challefau Binet!"

58
"Teach me quickly then,
Monsieur Binet, for in one
minute you will be arrested
for trespassing on the lands
of the Marquis de La Tour!"

59
"We are looking for a
seditious scoundrel, André-
Louis Moreau - wanted for
      the gallows."

60
"If you must thank me,
Monsieur, let me remain
       with you."

61
"Ah - umm - your stage
presence is bad and your
manners are worse. How-
ever, you seem to have
wit - that might be useful
in the writing of my plays -"

62
"My name? Call me -
   Monsieur X."

63
"- - and my daughter,
Mademoiselle Climène, who
inherits not only her father's
 looks, but his ability."

64
The passing months
  had brought no
word of André-Louis
   to Gavrillac.

65
In Paris - the
Blue Boar Inn.

66
         Success had come to 
        the Binet troupe, In
little more than a year this
vagrant pack of mountebanks
had become a self-respecting
company of first-rate players.

67
"Monsieur X! Monsieur X!
A year - and all we know
of you is a sharp tongue -
    and Monsieur X!"

68
"To Monsieur X, whose wit
has brought us wine - and
whose wine has brought 
        us wit!"

69
            To date their 
         most pretentious
effort - the presentation
of "Figaro-Scaramouche".

70
        The season box
       of the Countess
Thérèse de Plougastel.

71
"Of course, Monsieur, you
have met the Countess de
      Plougastel?"

72
At the final
  curtain.

73
"Now that we are again so
happily met, Mademoiselle,
may I not call - - with
 Madame's permission?"

74
       La Tour d'Azyr
  again - again Aline.
And Scaramouche - the
mountebank, the clown, must
love and laugh and play his part.

75
 Nothing is more
  wounding to a
woman's vanity than
the conquest which
 remains unmade.

76
"What have I done to make
   you dislike me so?"

77
"You are beautiful, are you
not Climène - and talented
       and clever?"

78
"And more to be desired
than the fairest lady who
would sell herself for wealth 
        and title!"

79
"Papa Binet, I congratulate
you! As the father of
Madame Scaramouche you
will yet be famous!"

80
      The following
     afternoon - an
unexpected visitor -

81
"You keep strange company
   these days, André."

82
"And you, Aline - is yours
     above reproach?"

83
"This man, La Tour d'Azyr
- how can you endure
        him?"

84
"He would make me 
  a great lady."

85
"God made you that, 
      Aline."

86
"You preach to me? After 
consorting with that theatre 
         girl?"

87
"That theatre girl, Aline, is
   going to be my wife."

88
"- and she does not seek
to sell herself for a high-
     sounding title!"

89
           Rumor had it that
          while the Countess
de Plougastel maintained her
brilliant salon in the Rue
du Paradis, her husband, in
Austria, sought aid for the
tottering throne of Louis XVI.

90
When beauty grieves,
consolation is not
 long forthcoming.

91
"Her betrothal to La Tour
d'Azyr may be announced 
      at any time."

92
After that evening's 
    performance.

93
"- the great Marquis, who
sits in the stage box, called
for Climène after the theatre."

94
"Where is Climène?"

95
"She - she has gone -
       driving."

96
"Promise me, my love, that
you will come to the theatre 
      for me tonight."

97
"As your intended husband,
   Mademoiselle, is it
impertinent to inquire the
 price you paid for that?"

98
"You mealy-mouthed prude!
Do you think I would give 
up a great gentleman for
   a nameless clown?"

99
"I had begun to think you
grotesque - - but you are
just vile - both of you!"

100
Beneath the brilliance
and beauty of Paris
- only heartache and
disillusionment - and
the haunting face of
   Scaramouche -

101
"Monsieur le Marquis,
it is my wish never to 
   see you again."

102
"Your old habits persist,
my friend! Aline saw you 
last night with that theatre 
          girl."

103
"Madame, I may not deserve 
it, but I need your help --
for I love Mademoiselle
          Aline."

104
"There is a little secret
  of Madame's past --"

105
At the wine-shop
"Aux Trois Colonnes."

106
"The people of Rennes want 
you to become their deputy
in the National Assembly."

107
"Chapelier, my friend, in the
Assembly one fights with
words. Stronger weapons
are needed to settle my
 score with Nobility."

108
"Moreau, your speech at
Rennes has borne fruit.
The people need but the
word, and they will rise
against Nobility to a man."

109
"That word may be spoken
sooner than you expect."

110
Once more André-Louis
donned the hose and
doublet of Scaramouche -
in his heart the fateful words
of Marat, and on his lips a
prayer - that the slayer of
Philippe de Vilmorin might be
  in his accustomed place.

111
"Citizens! Friends of the 
  People - of Liberty!"

112
"I shall tell you a story --
a story that calls for the
settlement of a score with
   Nobility - tonight!"

113
"It was not a duel - it was
the slaughter of a boy who
had in his heart only love
   for his fellow-men."

114
"Where does he hide - -
this tyrant who would
butcher all who speak for
        Liberty?"

115
"He is there - skulking
like a coward in that
         box!"

116
          During the ensuing 
        months, the National
Assembly became the scene of
Nobility's bitter opposition to
the decree that the People
should have equal voice
with them in the government
        of France.

117
Chapelier, the law 
        student of
Rennes, had become
president of the
National Assembly.

118
          Georges Jacques
           Danton - pock-
marked idol of the people
- mightiest orator of
       his time.

119
           Finding words of no
            avail against this
Niagara of eloquence, Nobility
had turned to its ancient
   weapon - the sword.

120
"Monsieur le Président!"

121
"With my own excuses for
being late, I bring those of
Deputy Lagron. Our debate
of yesterday has been
      settled - -"

122
"- - permanently!"

123
   Thus, under the legal 
      cloak of duelling,
did these master swords-
men dispose of those
deputies of the People who
spoke too well for Liberty.

124
"Now if that lout, Danton,
would accept a challenge,
the worst of our troubles
     would be over!"

125
"-- he is just the man
we need, one who shares
our deep regard for La
Tour d'Azyr. We will call
on him this afternoon."

126
In the Rue du Hazard -

127
"There is a swordsman
equal to that s-- La
    Tour d'Azyr!"

128
"Leave this to me. It will
be his last speech in the
Assembly - - or elsewhere."

129
At the close of 
  the session.

130
"You will be challenged.
Remember - the gizzard 
  is a vital spot!"

131
"Comedian! I shall kill 
    you for this!"

132
"Tragedian! The opportunity
  will be yours in the
  morning - behind the
  cathedral - at nine."

133
     Morning found
      the Assembly 
gripped in an intolerable
  suspense of waiting.

134
"The new deputy, Moreau,
    has shirked it!"

135
"Monsieur le Président!" With
my own, I bring the excuses 
of the Deputy Chabrillane.
Our debate of yesterday has 
    been settled - -"

136
"- - permanently!"

137
"Moreau! Moreau!
 Our saviour!"

138
  As the week passed,
    each day another
assassin of the people's
deputies had gone down
before the sword of the
fencing-master from the
    Rue du Hazard.

139
"Let me help you, André.
In the King's service you 
      might go far."

140
"As far as Austria, Madame?
Your husband's activities
 there are not unknown."

141
"Forgive me, André, if I
seem too closely interested.
I - - I knew your mother."

142
"To win back your regard,
Mademoiselle, there is
nothing I would not do."

143
"I am deeply grateful,
Monsieur, but I consented
to see you only to tell you
that there can never be
 more than friendship
     between us."

144
"The faithless dog! The
scoundrel! I pray that he
 may meet an avenging 
        sword!"

145
"Your prayer will soon
      be answered."

146
"We meet on Monday,
Mademoiselle - -
behind the cathedral."

147
"Why do you not stop him -
  beg him? What chance 
has André against such a
       swordsman?"

148
"Monsieur, give up this duel,
and what I said - that there
could never be more than
friendship between us - -
    I will retract."

149
"Honor, Mademoiselle, comes
before all else, even the
 heart; I cannot do it."

150
Monday.

151
"He is most solicitous for
his friend, the Marquis!"

152
"André! I have come from
Gavrillac to beg you - -
this duel must not take
         place!"

153
"You too, Aline?"

154
"You cannot save your
Marquis by trying to
   frighten me!"

155
"André - - do you not
understand? Come back,
André! It is you I love!"

156
"Oh, I feared something
dreadful - - but never
         this!"

157
"Pray God we may be 
      in time!"

158
"You realize now, Monsieur,
how Philippe de Vilmorin
     felt that day!"

159
"You have killed him!"

160
"You mentioned a mission
in the provinces, for the
Commune. I will accept it."

161
Through the months
  - the sullen
thunder of revolt, that
  grew and grew -

162
"Austria and Prussia
invade France to aid
     the King!"

163
"France has been betrayed!
   To arms, patriots!"

164
The morning of 
August 10th, 1792.

165
"Aux armes, citoyens!
Formez vos bataillons!"

166
"Madame! Danton leads
 the mob against the
  Tuileries Palace!"

167
  "We shall go immediately,
Jacques; prepare the carriage!"

168
        Eight o'clock - 
         the mob at the 
palace gates - and from
the National Assembly an
offer of protection to Louis
and the Royal family.

169
"Sire, a whole people are
advancing! If the palace
must fall, let it fall; but
let the crown be saved!"

170
At the City Gates,
    the avenue of
escape from Paris.

171
"Without permit, no one
  may leave the city."

172
"Madame, I know a place 
where the city wall is not 
watched. I will get word
to Monsieur de Kercadiou."

173
The Walls of 
   Paris.

174
   An interested 
   spectator - a
young artillery officer,
   out of service -

175
Napoléon Bonaparte.

176
All that day - the
  mad songs of a
 mob triumphant -
that seemed to come 
   ever nearer -

177
At Gavrillac -
the first refugees
  from Paris.

178
Returning to Paris
  - an emissary
of the dread Commune.

179
"We were the last to leave
 Paris without passports.
 The barriers are closed."

180
In the now silent
Tuileries, each hall,
passage and stairway
bore witness to the fury
of the day that had 
sealed the doom of the 
      Monarchy.

181
"They are searching every
house for aristocrats - -
killing - coming this way!"

182
"Then you can serve
Aline - and Madame
 de Plougastel?"

183
"Aline, yes; but Madame is
the wife of a conspirator
against France - - I cannot
         help her."

184
"André! Madame de
Plougastel - you must
     save her!"

185
"She is your mother."

186
"And you, Monsieur, - -
 you are of course - -"

187
"Who your father was
   I never knew."

188
"I am sorry, Monsieur -
sorry that I am not your 
         son."

189
         And through the 
        endless hours of
night - the screaming of
the grindstone, the roll
of drums, the shouts, the
bestial laughter of the
marching hosts of Terror.

190
"We must have courage.
Jacques will bring us aid."

191
"In less than an hour I will
return. Have a fresh horse
  ready - - and let this
  carriage follow me now."

192
"Irony, Thérèse - - that I
return to you for refuge;
but out there I should be
      torn to bits."

193
"You must go and rest
 until Jacques comes."

194
"Madame - my mother."

195
"I do not know how this
man came here, but I give
him three minutes to leave
       the house!"

196
"Monsieur, I was prepared to
call a truce, but now - -
give me those passports!"

197
"André! He is your 
      father!"

198
"Why did you not 
    tell me?"

199
"When you had turned from
   me? Should I have
disgraced myself - - my
        family?"

200
"In God's name, let there
  be peace between us."

201
 "May it serve you as
faithfully, Monsieur, as
  it has served me."

202
"Thérèse, if there is a wrong
  I regret more than any 
other, it is the wrong that
   I have done to you."

203
"Do you not know
     Moreau?"

204
"Moreau! It is Moreau!"

205
"But the women - give
 us the women! They
  are aristocrats!"

206
"They are my mother and
my betrothed! I ask you 
  for their safety!"

207
"Citizens! It is for you to
decide! Do you owe this
      to Moreau?"

208
"Open the gates! Make
   way for Moreau!"

THE END

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