Robin Hood

1
-"So fleet the works of men
Back to their earth again
Ancient and holy things
Fade like a dream"-

2
 Stately castles whose
turrets pierced the sky
have left imperishable 
record --

3
 Though the storms 
of centuries have laid
waste the works of men
their spirit soars on and
poets make live again
the days of chivalry.

4
  Mediaeval England -- England
in the Age of Faith. Her chronicles
tell of warriors and statesmen,
of royal Crusaders, of jousting
knights. Her ballads sing of
jolly friars, of troubadours, of
gallant outlaws who roamed
   her mighty forests.

5
 History -- in its ideal
state -- is a compound of
legend and chronicle
and from out both we
offer you an impression 
of the Middle Ages --

6
  Excitement rises
 high for the final
event in a tournament.

7
 From far and near
have come all England's 
knighthood for, on the
morrow, they depart
on the Holy Crusade.

8
 And so the lofty battle-
ments of the castle look
down upon the chivalry
of England in all its glory -

9
 Richard of the Lion Heart,
England's immortal King --
impulsive, generous and
brave --

10
 Prince John, the King's
brother -- sinister, dour,
his heart inflamed with
an unholy desire to suc-
ceed to Richard's throne --

11
 High above the clash 
of lance and shield in
joust and tourney, the
fairest maiden was chosen
to reign for a day as the
Queen of Love and Beauty-

12
 Lady Marian Fitzwalter,
from whose slim white
hands would fall the
chaplet of valor on the
victorious knight --

13
 Sir Guy of Gisbourne,
intimate of Prince John
and one of the two
contenders for the
championship --

14
  "Your veil for a 
favor, fair lady, that
you may see it worn
in victory."

15
   The other contender 
for the championship --
favorite of King Richard-

    The Earl of Huntingdon
    DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS

16
  The Earl of Huntingdon's 
trusted squire --

17
 To gain unfair ad-
vantage Gisbourne straps
himself to his saddle --

18
 "Brother, I'll gage you 
this against your prize 
falcon that Huntingdon 
wins the day."

19
 "On the knight with 
the white plume!"

20
 The marshals inspect
the equipment of the
contestants --

21
 "They splinter their
lances -- ever a good
omen for Huntingdon!"

22
 "I double mine on
Huntingdon!"

23
 "Huntingdon hath proved
his knightly mettle. We
hereby decree that on
this Holy Crusade he
shall be our second
in command."

24
 "Go to the fair maid,
Marian, and receive
the victor's crown."

25
  "Exempt me, sire.
I am afeared of women."

26
"Another woman!"

27
  In the great hall of 
the castle the feasting 
that followed close upon
the tournament has lasted 
far into the dawn --

28
 Brave hearts that smile 
through parting tears --

29
 Knightly lovers tell
again their love to
maidens fair --

30
  Ladies' eyes 
speak courage 
to their knights --

31
 Apart from the others,
Prince John and Sir Guy
of Gisbourne, dizzy with
wine and drunk with
thoughts of power --

32
The King's goblet --

33
 "Dog of a servant!
This on the morrow
shall be mine -- and every-
thing that is the King's
shall then be mine."

34
 "A servant hath a friend 
and his friend hath a 
friend. Be discreet, my
Prince."

35
"Where is Huntingdon?"

36
 "With dagger at head
he doth try his strength
for the goblet."

37
 "At such a time as this 
it were more befitting that
he try his love for a maid."

38
 "Why hast thou
not a maid?"

39
 "When I return,
good my liege."

40
 "Nay, before you go,
good my knight."

41
 "A castle and 
lands to the maid
who wins him."

42
 "You too shall have
your pick of maidens,
my Gisbourne."

43
 "So? Sits the wind
in that direction? The
Lady Marian, eh? A
goodly chance."

44
 "You forget, Sir Knight.
I am a Prince."

45
 "It is only the Prince
who has forgotten."

46
 "I regret, Lady Marian,
that a brother of our 
noble King should so
degrade his knighthood."

47
 "I fear you have
incurred his enmity --
in my behalf."

48
 "'Twas but my knightly
privilege --"

49
 "Interference is a
dangerous pastime,
my squire."

50
 "I-I never knew --
a maid -- could be --
like you --"

51
   Now -- all too
swiftly -- comes the 
hour of parting --

52
  -- and o'er the kneeling 
hosts the Bishop lifts
his hand in benediction --

53
 -- and for the cross
that gleams upon his 
shoulder each knight
breathes a silent vow-

54
 While on the
battlements --

55
"HUNTINGDON!"

56
 "My lord King, I go
to the Holy Land with
half a heart. The other
half I leave in the 
keeping of a maid."

57
 "Good! Now your
blade will be keener."

58
 "I leave in your keep-
ing my dearest treasure.
Guard her with your life."

59
 "See that Richard
never returns from 
the Holy Land."

60
"Nor Huntingdon."

61
 Even Kings must
wait on love --

62
 "Huntingdon's head
for Lady Marian's hand.
Do not forget."

63
 And so the very
flower of England's 
knighthood marched 
on to its high purpose.

64
 Scarce had the dust 
of the Crusaders settled
to the ground when the
dire mischief of Prince 
John was set afoot --

65
 "When the throne is 
mine, I will reward those 
who serve me. To your
task and spare no one."

66
 All of England fell
under the pall of 
Prince John's perfidy.

67
 By Prince John's 
orders the good
officials of the town 
of Nottingham are
ousted --

68
 "I am the High
Sheriff of Nottingham."

69
 The poor who can-
not pay the tax levy
are forced to give
up their belongings --

70
 For slaying a
wild boar in 
Prince John's forest --

71
 For spurning Prince
John's addresses --

72
 In Richard's castle
Prince John's hench-
men apprise him of
their evil successes --

73
 "Your bidding has 
been done. Huntingdon's 
castle is razed and burnt."

74
 One woman braver 
than the rest --

75
 "Have mercy on the
people of England."

76
 "Fret not your pretty
head for such as they."

77
 "Prince, your oppressions
will not please our King."

78
 "A Prince at home 
outranks a King abroad.
Think you not so,
beautiful lady?"

79
 "If Richard knew these 
things, there would be 
no Prince at home."

80
 "That maid bears
watching."

81
 In silence and
at night --

82
 "Take this message
and sleep nor night
nor day until you
reach your master."

83
 Day after day --
across the fields of
France -- the Crusaders
had plodded on --

84
 "Mark how Hunting-
don spurs them on.
He is the very back-
bone of the adventure."

85
 "A good way to crack
a head, my master. Would
'twere thy brother's."

86
 "To your tent. These
fevers are but passing
ills. Ere the night falls
thou wilt be able to 
march again.

87
 "He plays his tricks 
of discipline to cozen
favor of the King --
the sycophant!"

88
 "But for discipline
I'd twist you round
a tent pole and crack 
your spine!

89
"Why come you here?"

90
 "If the King should 
know of this, himself
would return and this 
Holy Crusade would fail."

91
 "If Richard had but 
one friend in England --"

92
"Fetch a falcon."

93
 "Speed this letter and
prepare our departure."

94
 "I pray you, my Lord
and King, to speak again
your trust in me which
you have so oft professed."

95
 "As I trust my right 
hand do I trust you.
You are my friend."

96
 "Then, my liege, your
leave and favor to return 
to England without un-
foldment of my purpose."

97
 "I humbly beseech you,
not as my King but 
as my friend, to place
unquestioned this trust 
in me."

98
"'Tis not the maid?"

99
 "You! Turned chicken-
hearted for a wench!"

100
 "You do but jest.
Go join the lances
of your King."

101
 "Sire, what needs
doing -- must be done.
But my heart aches 
that your friendship 
fails me."

102
"Sire, you must trust me!"

103
 "We wait not on 
permission. We go to
England though hell
itself should gape and
bid us stay."

104
"A deserter."

105
"Is this true?"

106
 "The truth is - that
back in England --"

107
 "Sire, the penalty 
is death."

108
 "Have his wound
attended."

109
 "Place him in that 
tower. He will remain 
a prisoner until our 
return. See to it that 
he is well cared for."

110
 "But, my liege, the 
penalty is death!"

111
"My command! Obey!"

112
 "Give them food 
and drink until our 
last column is well 
on its way. Then let 
them rot."

113
 In England Lady
Marian's serving woman
comes under the dread 
inquisition of John --

114
 "Tell me what 
has become of 
Huntingdon's squire."

115
 "I'll tell -- I'll tell.
'Tis true. He did carry
information from my 
mistress to the King."

116
 "Lady Marian shall
pay for this with her
life. So much for
meddling!"

117
 "Quick! Fly for your 
life. He means to kill."

118
 "I seek Lady Marian
Fitzwalter."

119
 "After her. Bring
her back. I'll put
an end to tattling!"

120
 Scarce was the last
column of England's 
knighthood well on 
its way when --

121
"Unlock the door."

122
 "To England - with
all haste. There is
work to do."

123
 While in England,
sturdy men, rebellious
to Prince John's tyranny,
sought refuge in 
Sherwood Forest --

124
"Prince John's deed!"

125
 These lusty rebels 
only wanted a leader 
to weld them into a
band -- an outlaw band 
destined to live immortal 
in legend and story.

126
 A friend of
Richard returns 
to his native soil --

127
 "Good my lord - poor
Lady Marian - 'twas 
on this very spot - here
- a riderless horse --
an overturned saddle --"

128
 "To God -- to Richard
-- and to Her."

129
 Thus it was that Huntingdon
buried his Yesterday. Here
began a new life -- a life to
be dedicated to revenge --
bitter -- but joyous.

130
 In far-off Palestine
Richard meets with 
victory and concludes 
a truce with the infidel --

131
 A year passed and 
then -- from the mysterious
depths of Sherwood Forest --
came whispers of the
rise of a robber chief --

132
"Robin Hood!"

133
 The High Sheriff 
of Nottingham --

134
 "'Tis the naked arrow
of Robin Hood and
sings death to the
enemies of King Richard."

135
 A butcher's stall 
in Locksley Town --

136
 "The three lions of
Richard. It is Robin
Hood's manner of saying:
'If ye be brave, come to
Sherwood Forest.
Richard is your King.'"

137
 The rich man 
of Wakefield --

138
 "He seems to be
everywhere. I confess
I am helpless. Our
very soldiers desert 
to join this outlaw's band."

139
"Fetch me a bag of gold."

140
 "This will put 
a stop to it."

141
"Robin Hood!"

142
Will Scarlett--

143
Friar Tuck--

144
Little John --

145
Robin Hood's lair --

146
"Mark you his hat."

147
Allan-a-Dale--

148
"Three blasts!"

149
"We rob the rich, relive distressed
On damned John to score.
We'll take a life if sorely pressed
Till Richard reign once more."

150
 While Prince John's 
dark schemes are sped 
in distant lands --

151
Richard's sleeping tent --

152
 "Now for England--
and my reward!"

153
 "Alas, poor fool.
Thou hast played 
king once too often."

154
"Gisbourne!"

155
 On the morrow a
messenger from England
relates the full measure
of Prince John's treachery--

156
"Let John get his bellyful!"

157
 "In Sherwood Forest a
gallant outlaw - a some-
time knight now known 
as Robin Hood -- hath a
band of followers and
doth thwart the Prince
at every turn."

158
"A robber knight, eh?"

159
"Methinks I know who 'tis."

160
 "Quick - to horse!
We go to England --
mayhap to join this 
outlaw's band."

161
 Prince John's hired
soldiers levy tribute
on the Priory of St.
Catherine's --

162
 "Has this Prince 
no regard for Holy 
Church?"

163
 While - nearby - Robin
Hood and his Merry 
Men distribute dole
to needy villagers --

164
Three blasts --

165
 "They are of the Priory 
of St. Catherine's."

166
The Priory garden --

167
 "It is Robin Hood 
and his men!"

168
 "Is that not the Earl 
of Huntingdon?"

169
"'Tis Robin Hood."

170
 "Robin Hood to 
the poor, mayhap, but
he was born Robert,
Earl of Huntingdon."

171
 "Prepare thyself.
Within these holy
walls there is some-
one dear to you."

172
"Lady Marian --"

173
 Scarce a day's journey 
away -- a menace to 
their new-found happiness --

174
Sir Guy of Gisbourne --

175
 "'Tis the Earl of
Huntingdon with
Lady Marian."

176
 "Each day do loyal 
men rally to our cause.
'Twill not be long ere we
storm the very castle itself."

177
 "An hundred troopers
approach!"

178
"To horse! I'll follow."

179
 "When the lark sings 
in the morn I'll send
you a message to
re-speak my love."

180
 "-- Robin Hood is the 
Earl of Huntingdon!"

181
 "Lady Marian Fitzwalter
lives --"

182
 "Surround this band of 
outlaws with all your 
men. By hook or crook
take Huntingdon alive."

183
 "Seize that wench. Drag
her here. She shall die
the death I promised."

184
 When the lark sings
in the morn --

185
 "To Lady Marian. Tell
her that when the sun
drops o'er Nottingham
hill, I'll come to her."

186
His lady and his King --

187
 "All the troops from
Nottingham Town 
surround the forest."

188
 "'Tis a good time 
to take the town."

189
 "To the trees with 
all our men. Entrap
these troops. I go to
Nottingham with Scarlett
and Alan-a-Dale. We
three shall take the town."

190
 While in the forest
Robin Hood's men en-
trap the troops --

191
 Near the gates of 
Nottingham Town --

192
"Rouse the townspeople!"

193
 "Man the walls! Every
mother's son of you!"

194
"To the postern door!"

195
The postern door--

196
 "The Prince's soldiers --
Lady Marian - brutally
abducted - the saints protect
her - fly to your master."

197
 "Richard is dead!
Long live King John!"

198
 "Heralds to the north!
To the south! England 
is mine!"

199
 A mysterious stranger
invades Sherwood Forest --

200
"He seeks Robin Hood."

201
 "Why seek you
Robin Hood?"

202
 "He says 'Mayhap to
join him -- mayhap
to slay him.'"

203
 "So ho, my pretty
knight! To do either
you needs must prove
your mettle first!"

204
"I'll knop your scop."

205
 "With such strength --
thou almost makst me think
thou art Richard himself."

206
 "Each member of this 
band hath an arrow 
in yon tree. Speed yours!"

207
 Exulting in their 
freedom, the people of 
Nottingham Town hang 
Prince John in effigy --

208
"We'll take a life if sorely pressed
Till Richard reign once more."

209
 "Soldiers have carried
her away to the castle."

210
 "Damn their black 
hides! I'll lash them 
till they bleat!"

211
"Keep the town!"

212
 "I go to the castle. You
to the Forest. Fetch every
man. We'll make John sing
a pretty song to-night!"

213
"Close the drawbridge!"

214
"Gisbourne--"

215
 "My men are on 
their way. Watch 
for them."

216
"If they fail --"

217
Three blasts--

218
"I surrender."

219
"Robin Hood is taken."

220
 "Forty archers
make ready."

221
 "We shall teach you 
which way to face!"

222
 "Bind him to yon 
post. When I dip 
my dagger, he dies."

223
 "We have captured
the outlaws. Lower
the bridge."

224
 The High Sheriff
of Nottingham --

225
 Prince John's chief
henchmen --

226
"And Richard reign once more."

227
"Huntingdon!"

228
"Huntingdon!"

229
"HUNTINGDON!"

230
"Hear ye all!"

231
 "Until now Richard
has never bowed his
head to man."

232
 "But I did mistrust 
my friend and with all
humility do ask forgiveness."

233
"To-night!"

234
That night --

235
In the courtyard --

236
 The bride and 
the groom escape 
the wedding revels --

237
"Huntingdon!"


The End

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