Raffles, the Amateur Cracksman ('17)

1
     PROLOGUE
"The Affair of the
 Great Rose Pearl."

2
On the Mediterranean.

3
      The so-called
   "Count de Bauderay."
Mr. John Barrymore.

4
          "SHIPS THAT PASS--"
Nearing the end of the voyage, Mrs. Vidal,
divorcée, finds that her harmless flirtation
has ripened into love.
               Miss Christine Mayo.

5
Mr. Hawtree, whose no-
torious stock promotions
have impoverished thous-
ands, leaves India --
for India's good.

6
"I hope I don't intrude."

7
"Happy dreams,
 Mr. Hawtree."

8
"That man has the audacity
 to make love to me. I
 can't stand him."

9
"Relieving such as he of
 their ill-gotten gains to
 restore to their victims
 would be my conception
 of an ideal vocation."

10
"I suppose he thinks he
 can put you out of the
 running because he has
 bought the famous rose
 pearl of India --- but
 I shouldn't tell that --
 it's a secret."

11
"Why keep his secrets?
 He is the crookedest
 man in Australia ---
 besides I suppose
 the pearl is secure in
 the ship's safe."

12
"Oh, no, it isn't, he
 showed it to me this
 morning. Asked me
 if I would like to
 wear it."

13
Midnight.

14
Mackensie --- Ship's detective.

15
The uncanny sensation
that someone has been
       in the room.

16
"That's the Count's room."

17
"I will have to search
 everyone on this ship."

18
"I'll just 'break' this
 gun if you don't 
 mind--may prevent
 an accident.

19
"Powder!"

20
       DAWN

A strange figure on
  a foreign shore.

21
        A YEAR LATER.
The exclusive Cambridge Club
of London discusses a series
of daring robberies attributed
to an unknown person, popularly 
called
    "The Amateur Cracksman."

22
Lord Amersteth
  of Milchester Manor.
       Mr. H. Cooper Cliff.

23
After a year's absence,
Mr. A. J. Raffles, Champion
Cricketer of England,
returns unannounced from
his triumphs in Australia.

24
"You simply must help us
win our cricket match again
this year and stay the week
end with us--that is, if you
are not afraid of The
Amateur Cracksman!"

25
Bunny Manders, old college chum
of Raffles, loses as usual to
Lord Amersteth's son, Crowley.
 Bunny--Frank Morgan--
     Crowley--Dudley S. Hill.

26
"Oh yes, Raffles, I know
Bunny very well -- you
can't keep him away from 
Milchester now that my 
ward, Gwendolyn, is with us."

27
"I was just telling
 Raffles that 'The
 Amateur Cracksman'
 has reappeared."

28
"It's a wonder he 
hasn't attempted to get
the Melrose necklace."

29
"Impossible! We are pro-
tected from cellar to roof."

30
Raffles plays on
the cricket team
of Milchester.

31
Gwendolyn, 
  Lord Amersteth's ward,
     Miss Kathryn Adams.

32
Ethel,
   His daughter
      Miss Evelyn Brent.

33
Lady Melrose,
  Sister-in-law of
  Lord Amersteth and
  owner of the famous
 "Melrose" necklace.
     Miss Mathilde Brundage.

34
"So glad you could
 come down Mrs. Vidal."

35
"You are going to meet 
  the most delightful 
  man!"

36
"Mrs. Vidal, may I introduce
 our champion cricketer,
 Mr. A. J. Raffles?"

37
"I think I met Mr. Raffles
 once before."

38
  At Dinner That Night.
 Raffles falls a victim to
"The light that lies in
 Gwendolyn's eyes ---"

39
Crawshay, burglar, makes
a "Professional" call at
Milchester Manor.
          Mike Donlin.

40
"------ tonight . . . . .
   I can get it!"

41
"Mr. Raffles seems as good
 at love making as he is
 at cricket--plays a lovely
 game, doesn't he?"

42
"If its Raffles, I can
 understand it--every-
 one loves him. I would
 give him all I have in
 the world but --"

43
"Gwendolyn, you know
 how long I've loved
 you --- Now I want
 your decision."

44
"Is there someone else?"

45
"-- I will never
 give him you."

46
"I am not yours to give 
    or take, Bunny."

47
The Amateur Cracksman is
the topic of the evening.

48
"If the Amateur Cracksman
 knows your necklace is
 here, Lady Melrose, he
 will surely visit us."

49
"Don't worry, ladies, the
 house is burglar proof.
 Besides, the cleverest
 detective in England is
 coming here this evening."

50
"That's interesting!
     Who is it?"

51
"Mr. George Bedford."

52
"Bedford is a neighbor 
 of ours, a retired Sherlock
 Holmes. Rewards cannot
 tempt him, - - but the
 Cracksman does."

53
"Father keeps guns all
 over the house for fear
 of the cracksman."

54
Mr. George Bedford,
     Mr. Frederick Perry.

55
"And this is A. J. Raffles,
 'Champion Cricketer
     of England'."

56
"I have long desired
 to meet you. I know
 your fame as a
 detective."

57
"Sorry for that -- I hate
   the name detective."

58
"So do I."

59
"What a superb necklace!
 The Cracksman would
 endow a hospital if he
 ever got his hands
 on it."

60
"Pardon, I may have to
 identify it some day."

61
"In Amsterdam or Paris
 the Cracksman could
 sell every stone separately
 without leaving a clue."

62
"Then it would be
 difficult to catch him."

63
"Every pitcher goes
 to the well once too
 often. The Cracksman
 will be caught."

64
"I'm inclined to give
 odds against his
 capture--Who's to
 describe him? Who's
 ever seen him?"

65
"I HAVE!"

66
"You should com-
 municate at once
 with Scotland Yard!"

67
"I have thought seri-
 ously of doing so."

68
"It was in connection
 with the great "Rose
 pearl affair" on the
 Mediterranean steamer.
 He called himself the
 Count de Bauderay."

69
"We thought he was
 drowned but I am convinced
 that he and the Cracksman
 are one and the same."

70
"Mackensie handled that
 case. Too bad he died."

71
"Won't you describe
 the man, Mrs. Vidal."

72
"It's so long ago -- he
 has without doubt
 changed much since then."

73
"The dearest wish
 of my heart is to
 meet the Cracksman
 face to face."

74
"I hope I may be
 present when you do."

75
"So long as the jewels 
  are locked in my
  safe every night,
  no one need worry."

76
"Have you any
valuables to go
 in the safe?"

77
"And you Mrs. Vidal?"

78
"No!!!"

79
"I'm afraid you don't
 trust me."

80
"Yes, I would trust you
 with anything, although
 you have made me
 sympathize with that
 dreadful Cracksman."

81
"I have a sort of sneaking
 sympathy for him myself --
 more than he deserves."

82
"I don't trust that new safe,
 it's the first place a burglar
 would try---so I simply
 send down my empty 
 jewel case and keep the
 necklace in my room."

83
"Is that a perfectly
 safe safe?"

84
Bunny gives Crowley
a check to cover his
losses.

85
"Weaving the net, spread-
 ing it and then catching
 the man who has evaded
 Scotland Yard must indeed
 be rare sport---I can
 think of only one rarer."

86
"Dodging the catcher."

87
"Every thief eventually
 gets caught. Fear paralyzes
 the hunted criminal and,
 sooner or later, he gives
 himself away."

88
"But if he has no fear, how
 can you capture him? The
 intelligent thief has an
 advantage over the
 intelligent detective."

89
"Quite right---it takes
 an artist to catch an
 artist."

90
"I know you
 are the---"

91
"On that voyage you
 made me fall in love
 with you. I have never
 forgotten."

92
"You know a steamship
 flirtation is never
 serious."

93
"I'll see you in prison
 before I'll let you win
 Gwendolyn."

94
"In that case, Mrs. Vidal,
 permit me to bid you--
 good night."

95
"I've just given Crowley
 a bad check --- haven't
 a pound in the bank."

96
"I'm short of cash, my-
 self, but I'll find the
 money somewhere."

97
"Raffles, I'd go through
 Hell for you."

98
"Do you know you
 have won from me
 the girl I love!"

99
"Bunny, I wouldn't win
 her if I could."

100
"Not everything -- I'll try
 to win her for you."

101
Crawshay gives 
  the signal.

102
"There's your man, Bedford!"

103
"No, it's Crawshay,
 professional burglar,
 not the Amateur
 Cracksman, Mr. Raffles."

104
"So that's your name,
 is it -- Raffles! I'll
 remember that when
 I get out and don't
 you forget it."

105
Before breakfast.

106
"I'm very sorry, Mrs.
 Vidal, but you must
 forget that incident."

107
"Then I shall have
 to tell Mr. Bedford
 just who you are."

108
"Because it is my
 will against yours."

109
"Sorry, must run up
 to London this morning."

110
"We are all going this
 evening, can't you
 wait till then?"

111
"The necklace is safe in
 Lady Melrose's room.
 She sent down the empty
 jewel case last night."

112
"Everyone is under
 suspicion, Mrs. Vidal."

113
"Crawshay has escaped!
 My assistant is follow-
 ing him to London."

114
"He may not have the
 necklace but he will
 lead us to it."

115
"Try to smile, Lady
 Melrose, the necklace
 is quite safe. Let Mr.
 Bedford do the worrying
 -- that's his business."

116
"I give you my word that
 the necklace will be re-
 turned by midnight."

117
"I have a friend who needs
 a hundred and fifty pounds.
 As a sporting proposition
 I'd like to wager that sum
 that you don't recover it
 by midnight."

118
After breakfast.

119
"There is a man who
 loves you but who
 feels absolutely
 unworthy of you."

120
"Only a good woman can
 help him--only your love
 can save the best friend
 I have in the world --
 Bunny Manders."

121
"My dear, I wouldn't take
 the departure of Mr. Raffles
 so much to heart --- he
 really isn't worth it."

122
"Hasn't it struck you as
 strange that Mr. Raffles is
 usually near when the Ama-
 teur Cracksman makes a haul?"

123
"I don't blame her --
 I'm a failure -- I'll be
 disgraced if I don't
 meet that check."

124
"I think our friend Bedford
 will pay for that."

125
"Perhaps Mr. Bedford would
 like to look over my bag."

126
"When you are in London
 why don't you drop in on
 me at the Albany?"

127
"I will."

128
At Raffles' apartments
 in the Albany that
 evening.

129
"Crawshay is around
 evidently trying to
 get to Mr. Raffles."

130
"Are you thinking 
 of her?"

131
"Just dropped in to tell
 you we are at the Savoy.
 The ladies became
 nervous after you left."

132
"There he is -- watch him.
 I'm going to Raffles'
 rooms to get the lay
 of the land."

133
"Haven't had time to
 cash your check yet."

134
"What's Bedford
 prowling around 
 outside for?"

135
"I came to warn you
 that Crawshay is about
 the house, evidently bent
 upon revenge."

136
"I hope you don't find
 that necklace. I can
 use that hundred and
 fifty pounds."

137
"I'll surely have it
 before midnight."

138
"The man is on
 the roof, sir."

139
"Bedford has found the
 Amateur Cracksman!"

140
"Yes, I'm the Amateur
 Cracksman."

141
"I simply couldn't resist
   taking it, right under
 Bedford's nose."

142
"I intend to send it back
 as soon as I win the bet
 to cover your check."

143
"Ah, Bunny! There's no
 excitement to compare with
 one minute at dead of night
 on another man's stairs -- a
 door opens -- someone is
 listening -- your very life
 hangs in the balance --"

144
"I've never stolen a
 farthing for personal
 gain, Bunny. I've robbed
 the rich and given to the 
 poor, and yet -- God knows
 why -- I'm just a thief."

145
"I said I'd go through
 Hell for you --- and
 I will."

146
"Wait five minutes. We'll
 catch them red-handed.
 They'll be splitting
 the necklace."

147
"Get the sparklers, an'
 be quick about it."

148
"Blast yer, yer could
 take the fillin's out of
 a cove's back teeth
 without disturbin' 'is
 conversation."

149
"Delicate sense of humor,
 eh, Bunny?"

150
"Leave me alone with
 Mr. Crawshay, Bunny,
 I'll meet you at the
 club for dinner."

151
"Don't try any funny
 business with the
 police or I'll tell
 them your friend is
 the Cracksman."

152
"Bunny! Better
 take your tobacco
 pouch with you."

153
"Now you come a-
 cross with dem jew-
 els---or I'll blow
 you out as easy as
 kiss yer 'and'!"

154
"If you do, you'll
 hang for it. Bunny 
 saw you here."

155
"There goes your rope."

156
"It's the police!"

157
"Give me the key
 and I'll prove it."

158
"I'll call yer bluff."

159
"Open in the name
 of the law!"

160
"Shall I?"

161
"Gawd love yer,
 Mister! Don't let 
 'em take me. Git
 me out o' this an' I'll
 call it square."

162
"Chloroform!"

163
"Where am I?"

164
"Did you get your
 man, Bedford?"

165
"Order a cab --
 we will be late
 for dinner."

166
A quiet dinner
 at the club.

167
"You might return
 my tobacco pouch."

168
Mrs. Vidal decides
to give Raffles a
last chance.

169
"From the glances that
 passed between you
 and Mr. Raffles, I'm
 sure you met him be-
 fore. Where was it?"

170
"He is the man of the
'Great Pearl' affair and
 I believe he is the
 Amateur Cracksman."

171
"And I'm sure of
 it-- I have a war-
 rant for his arrest."

172
"By tomorrow morning,
 all London will know
 who you are. You
 must leave England
 and you must take
 me with you."

173
"If I leave England,
 Mrs. Vidal, I shall
 go alone."

174
"Mr. Raffles, I have a
 warrant for your arrest."

175
"Bedford is just
 paying me a
 little visit."

176
"Please, Bedford, let
 me tell her myself.
 You can explain to
 Lord Amersteth in
 the other room."

177
"Don't let anyone 
 leave this room."

178
"Word of honor you
 won't try to escape
 until we return?"

179
"She practically
 said you were --"

180
"I am the Amateur
 Cracksman."

181
"I am worse than a
 thief --- I have stolen
 your love."

182
"You must escape ---
 our car is at the door."

183
"Midnight, Bedford!
 You haven't recovered
 the necklace and you
 owe me one hundred
 and fifty pounds."

184
"I feared I should
 lose, so I came
 prepared."

185
"Bunny, here is that little
 debt I promised to pay
 to-night."

186
"I've lost the bet
 but I've caught the
 Amateur Cracksman."

187
"You haven't landed
 him yet."

188
"You'll give it
 all up?"

189
"Well, I'm deucedly
 glad he escaped.
 He's splendid!"


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