Love's Prisoner

1
Poverty is tragic because
it robs children of
childhood. From the
beginning, its subjects
are dreary little men
    and women.

2
Nancy, one of those born
to this yoke, but fight-
ing to free herself 
with the energy of an
unusual spirit.

	_ _ _ OLIVE THOMAS.

3
"Where's father? It's
 the police-what do 
 they want now?"

4
Nancy's sisters,
Sadie and Jane;

	ANN KROMAN
	DOLLY DARE.

5
And the father, no longer
possessing either the
ability or the inclinations
of early criminal years--
but to whom nevertheless,
the law meant persecu-
tion as well as prosecution.

	_ _ _ WALTER PERRY.

6
It was convenient to fasten
an unsolvable crime 
on an old offender--but
the law made no provisions
for his children. That
problem was left to Nancy.

7
Jonathan Twist, a quaint
philosopher and their some-
what mysterious neighbor,
proved a good Samaritan.

	TWIST..William V. Mong.

8
"--and so they wished it onto
 him, and he's gone up for a
 stretch that means his life.
 They never gave him an even
 break, though he tried an
 tried-- I hate the law-- I
 hate the men that make it--"

9
"There! There! You'd best
 all come to live with
 me. You'll have a better 
 chance, and -- I won't
     be so lonely."

10
"You--you're an angel,
 Mr. Twist, even if you
 haven't got wings!"

11
"Go straight--get a job--keep
 busy!" Nancy remembered
 her father's advice and
 determined to go the one-
 way which he learned,
 too late, meant lasting
       happiness.

12
And the dwelling of 
Jonathan Twist rang
with youthful and wholly
unaccustomed laughter.

13
"I got the job! I start
 demonstrating Monday!"

14
Was her success the
triumph of Climax Cocoa
---or a victory of girlish
sincerity and youthful
     enthusiasm?

15
"From Nancy!"

16
New vistas of life open 
to Nancy's eyes. Awaken-
ing ambitions cry out 
   for fulfilment.

17
A thoroughly
feminine longing.

18
Lord Cleveland, a British
peer who first of all was
a business man, spending
much of his time in the
United States.

	- - - HARVEY CLARK.

19
"If you might have
 anything in that win-
 dow you wished, what
 would you choose?"

20
Over her tiny cups 
of cocoa, the noble-
man courted her.

21
How swiftly the crises of 
life go by! Marriage made
the tenement girl Lady
Cleveland--and following
close upon their splendid
honeymoon, death made 
her a widow. Once more 
  Nancy was alone.

22
Were the milestones of
the past omens of her
future? The death of 
her father, in prison--the
death of her husband--the
loss of her English estate--

23
A visit which was to 
mean much for Nancy.

24
"Tell Mr. Hackett
 her ladyship will
 be down directly."

25
"I'm afraid you made
 a mistake in not
 putting up a legal
 fight for your late
 husband's estates in
      England."

26
"The courts have awarded
 you his American holdings,
 but he had transferred
 his investments to England,
 until little more than this
 home remained here--and
 there is nothing which
 will yield you an income
     to maintain it."

27
Once more The Law was
against her, but Lady
Cleveland determined
that it should not drive
her back to poverty or
old associations. She
told Hackett that she
would manage, somehow.

28
A day of old
associations.

29
"The country has been
 a bit of paradise to
 them. They're both won-
 derfully well--and happy."

30
A sincere pity born of
understanding-- and from
that pity came Nancy's
determination to give
them, not casual charity,
but real help and uplift.

31
When the period of 
polite mourning had 
passed, Lady Cleveland
renewed her popularity
   as a hostess.

32
The Bureau of Detectives,
Police Headquarters.

33
Shorty Dorgan--will-
ing, but unlucky.
........LOUIS DURHAM.

34
"Lost him again. I
 tell you that darned
 Bird has got wings!"

35
"Well, out with it!
 What happened
 after the watchman
   telephoned?"

36
"We've got him bottled
 up. When you hear the
 whistle, go to it!"

37
"--an' since then
 I've been shadowin'
 the wrong guy all
 over New Jersey!"

38
"Shorty, this job needs
 brains, not feet. I
 guess I'll have to
 give you a transfer."

39
While Lady Cleveland's 
ball was proving one
of the most brilliant
functions of the season.

40
"That pendant cost
 ten thousand -- we
 bought it in Paris."

41
"Had a day off in
 Jersey, Shorty?"

42
"My dear Mrs. Vanderman!--
 This is dreadful, but if
 we're to recover your
 diamonds, for the present 
 no one here must know 
 that anything unusual has
 happened. I'll call the police."

43
"I'll call you back
 in five minutes."

44
Jim Garside, a ranking
police officer never
seen in uniform, who
had solved the most
mysterious crimes in
the city's history.

....... JOE KING.

45
"The very man I wanted
 to see! They tell me
 you gave a great account 
 of yourself in France!"

46
The ribbon of The Legion
of Honor--mute testimony
to Jim Garside's rare and
dangerous service to all
the Allies in the Intelli-
gence Department of the
American Expeditionary Force.

47
"I'm sending you Captain
 James Garside. Receive 
 him as your guest."

48
"Jim, it's up to you. If you
 can bag this Bird it'll
 be the biggest trick you
 ever turned. Listen a
 minute and I'll give
   you the story--"

49
On the rosy edge
of a dark problem.

50
"My name is Garside.
 I am from Police
   Headquarters."

51
"You don't look a bit
 like a detective!"

52
"Will you wait here
 a moment? I'll bring
   Mrs. Vanderman."

53
"I didn't leave the
 floor a moment---and
 I know the pendant
 was there when I
 began to dance."

54
Garside found his
hostess as fascinating
---and as baffling---
as the problem he
 came to solve.

55
"I agree with the
 Inspector. This is
 undoubtedly the
 work of the Bird."

56
"---the most dangerous
 chap at large, I should
 say. Always works alone,
 and has yet to leave
 a clue. And winging him
 has been put up to me."

57
Having eliminated
everyone but the
guests, Garside close-
ly scrutinized the 
departing throng.

58
"Well---are you going
 to catch the thief?"

59
"I am."

60
The cleverest of thieves
must have a "fence," an
agent to dispose of the 
plunder, and the devoted
and loyal Jonathan Twist
had performed this office
for Nancy from the first.

61
"You were a lot younger
 than that, Nancy,
 when your father made
 you lift my watch to
 show me how well you
 were getting on!"

62
"I guess I wasn't
 meant to be honest.
 You've been a wonderful
 friend, Jonathan--there
 isn't a man like you
 in the whole world!"

63
Only she and Jonathan
knew the true source
of the money she con-
tinued to spend so
freely after the death
of her husband and the
loss of the English estate.

64
Faint but certain clues
had pointed out the 
tranquil old watch-
maker as a receiver 
of stolen property
for the elusive Bird.

65
"I've seen a stranger
 or two loitering
 about lately-- you
 can't be too careful!"

[final reel missing]


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