Lorna Doone

1   
           Foreword

Tho this romance is of a time
 two and a half centuries gone,
"Lorna Doone" triumphantly outlives
more modern literature. Its story
is never old - never new

By all tests, it stands today the
 best-liked and most widely read
novel of great love and thrilling ad-
venture. It has, in fact, become a
literary heritage of Civilization.

2
Famous among the taverns
of old England is the
White Horse Inn, near the
coast of Devonshire.

3
John Ridd, son of a
Devonshire farmer, on
his way home from
boarding school.

4
"Now hurry, Master John,
 while I saddle the
 horses - or we won't
 get home tonight."

5
Lorna, daughter of 
the Countess of Lorne.

6
"Highwaymen on the
 London Road! The
 Doones - the bloody
      Doones!"

7
The Doones - an
outlawed clan of
thieves and cut-
throats.

8
"I know the customs 
 of highwaymen - they
 never attack ladies.
 Tell Robin to make
 haste with the horses."

9
"Take my advice and
 keep off the Moor.
 The coast road is
 longer, but safer."

10
High-born maiden and
farmer's lad - melting
with childhood's magic
touch the barriers of
        rank.

11
"I wish you were going 
 with us, John - they
 say there are robbers 
     on the road."

12
"Take it to remember 
 me by and use it on 
 the robbers if you 
      have to."

13
To her true knight
his Lady's gage.

14
"Goodbye, John. You
 won't forget me, will
        you?"

15
"If so be you take
 the Coast Road -
 when you come to
 the big rocks, drive
 like the devil!"

16
The solemn hour 
before sunset, a
protecting cloak for
evil men and deeds
of darkness.

17
Sir Ensor Doone, an
exiled Nobleman -
victim of political 
wrongs which have made
him an enemy to man-
       kind.

18
Fear for the safety
of his little sweetheart
urges John to follow
the coach.

19
"The brat has spirit.
 She'll make a fine 
 sweetheart for a Doone
 some day."

20
"When I grow up,
 I'll fight them until
 every Doone is dead."

21
Imprisoned in the Valley
of the Doones, thru years
of loneliness and despair,
Lorna blossoms into love-
ly womanhood.

22
A solitary maiden, whose
only friends are birds
and flowers and her
companions - books.

23
"Give it to me ------
 or I'll tell Sir Ensor
       Doone."

24
The voice that 
softens when it
speaks her name.

25
"Sir Ensor, pity this
 poor, wild bird. The
 children would cage 
         it."

26
In the heart of the
merciless man, love
for Lorna has found 
a dwelling place.

27
"Counsellor" Doone -
 whose crafty, scheming
 brain has earned him
 his nickname.

28
The secret of Lorna's
careful upbringing -
the fact that she is
heiress to the great
estates of Lorne.

29
"My son Carver
 desires her, and has
 no objection to a
 legal marriage."

30
Doone Gate ---- the
fortified entrance to
the Robbers' stronghold.

31
Carver Doone -
 the wildest of that
 daredevil crew.

32
The wives of the Doones -
 courted by violence 
 and doomed to a life of
 brutality.

33
John Ridd, the boy
of yesterday - now
known as the strongest
man in Devonshire.

34
His simple heart
delighting in 
innocent feats of
   strength.

35
"Carver wouldst have 
 thee for his legal wife."

36
Coarse delight and
savage motherhood -
marriage with a Doone
    meant that.

37
"As long as I live,
 Lorna shall choose
   for herself!"

38
The river that leads 
to the stronghold of 
     the Doones.

39
Out of the mad whirl 
of water came a vision 
of loveliness to John, as
he lay stunned and 
      bruised.

40
"I am John Ridd,
  who are you?"

41
Memories of
 Yesterday.

42
"Lorna!"

43
"You - a Doone!"

44
"I know not my true
 name, but I am no
 Doone, nor of their
        kin."

45
"This path leads to
 the Moor; 'tis your
    only chance."

46
"If you ever need help, 
 Lorna, set a signal 
 on that rock and I will 
      come to you."

47
Barely a mile from 
the valley of the Doones -
the peaceful home of
     John Ridd.

48
His cousin, Ruth - who
  loves him secretly.

49
"What has come over 
 you, John? You were
 never unkind to me
       before."

50
"Dear Ruth, if I have
 seemed to slight you,
 I meant it not. For-
      give me!"

51
Years of strife and
tumult take their toll
and only the unconquerable
will survives as Sir Ensor's
life slowly ebbs away.

52
"It was your Mother's
 necklace - forgive me
 if you can, Lorna."

53
"Signal from yonder 
 peak so that it may 
 be seen from the 
        Moor!"

54
"Ride to London Town
 with all speed and give
 this to Countess Brandir!"

55
Unconsciousness that
   precedes death.

56
"Drink to thy new Master!
 Drink to damnation of
 old Sir Ensor! Drink to
 my bride - warm wine
 for my bride of ice!"

57
"Summon the Blind Monk!"

58
Even as Death's grip
tightens - Sir Ensor
Doone rules supreme.

59
Then days when the 
golden hours of love's
whispered confidences
seemed but fleeting
moments.

60
"Lorna - my promised
 love - mine to be
 for all time."

61
"I am the Countess of
 Brandir, Lady Lorna
     is my ward."

62
"Sir Ensor Doone on
 his death-bed righted 
 a great wrong, and I
 have come to take Lady 
     Lorna away."

63
"-- A lady?"

64
"It is the King's com-
 mand, and may not be
     disobeyed."

65
The sacrifice --
urging her to go.

66
"John, do you really 
   wish me to go?"

67
"I go because you
 think it best but
 some day, I'll come
   back to you."

68
Then came months of
lonely separation and
a final determination to
seek Lorna in far-away
       London.

69
"Tis a present for
 the Lady Lorna -
 a green goose all the
   way from Devon."

70
"If you would speak
 with Lady Lorna, attend
 tomorrow at the Christen-
 ing of the Royal Infant."

71
A dramatic moment in
history - the Baptism
of an English Prince.

72
 His Majesty
King James II.

73
Conspirators against
     the Crown.

74
Proud to acknowledge 
her humble lover before
the Peers of England.

75
"I have wasted my praises
      on a clown!"

76
"Ouch! My foot --
  thou knave!"

77
With but one thought -
to leave London far
      behind.

78
When the light of
hope goes out of
Life, and there is
no more joy in the
homely task ---

79
"- Breaking your mother's
 heart for the sake of
 that hussy Lorna
      Doone!"

80
"Lorna - I am but
  country-born and
  lack manners. I 
  made a fool of 
  myself and you!"

81
"I am no longer Lady
  Lorna - I have
  renounced my title.
  Our love means
  much more to 
  me."

82
The wedding of two
    true loves.

83
A jealousy that seeks
 vengeance through
     treachery.

84
"I, Lorna, take 
 thee, John --"

85
"Speak to me, Lorna -
   speak to me!"

86
"I - Lorna - take - 
  thee - John -"

87
"I'll fight them until
 every Doone is dead!"

88
Horrified at the result
of her own treachery
and fearing for the life
of John who is headed
for the Doone strong-
        hold.

89
Angered beyond all en-
durance by this last out-
rage of the Doones, the
peace loving Yeomen rise 
to arms to rid the land 
    of its scourge.

90
"Carver Doone - thou
 cowardly assassin and
 murderer - I'll fight
 thee hand to hand!"

91
"There be more coming
 from Dulverton and
        Oare!"

92
"Follow me, twenty good
 Yeomen -- to surprise
 them from the rear!"

93
The surprise attack upon
the village of the Doones
     from the rear.

94
The pent-up fury of
a peaceful people carries 
   all before it.

95
Warned of his escape -
John relentlessly follows
the hated Doone.

96
Hatred unloosens all John
Ridd's strength as he
tears the muscle from
   Carver's arm.

97
"'I, Lorna, take thee, 
      John --'."

98
For love can open
the gates of death -
 and Lorna lives!

The
   End

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