Little Old New York

1
        The Cosmopolitan Corporation
                  Presents
                MARION DAVIES
                     IN
                 "LITTLE OLD
                  NEW YORK"
                      by
              RIDA JOHNSON YOUNG
Copyrighted MCMXXIII by William Randolph Hearst

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2
   Distributed by
GOLDWYN-COSMOPOLITAN

PASSED BY THE NATIONAL
   BOARD OF REVIEW

3
HARRISON FORD
     as
Larry Delavan

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4
COURTENAY FOOTE
      as
 Robert Fulton
 
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5
MAHLON HAMILTON
      as
Washington Irving

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6
     SAM HARDY
        as
Cornelius Vanderbilt
 
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7
 ANDREW DILLON
       as
John Jacob Astor
 
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8
GEORGE BARRAUD
      as
Henry Brevoort

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9
 NORVAL KEEDWELL
       as
Fitz Greene Halleck

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10
 RILEY HATCH
     as
Philip Schuyler

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11
CHARLES KENNEDY
      as
    Reilly
 
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12
   THOMAS FINDLAY
         as
Chancellor Livingston
 
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13
CHARLES JUDELS
      as
   Delmonico

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14
  HARRY WATSON
      as
Bully Boy Brewster

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15
SPENCER CHARTERS
       as
     Bunny
 
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16
  LOUIS WOLHEIM
       as
The Hoboken Terror 

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17
J. M. KERRIGAN
      as 
  John O'Day

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18
STEPHEN CARR
     as
Patrick O'Day

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19
MARIE R. BURKE
      as
 Mrs. Schuyler

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20
 MARY KENNEDY
     as
Betty Schuyler

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21
ELIZABETH MURRAY
       as
 Rachel Brewster

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22
GYPSY O'BRIEN 
      as
Ariana du Puyster

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23
AND

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24
MARION DAVIES
     as
Patricia O'Day

25
The early years of 
the nineteenth century
find Bowling Green
the center of the
activities of little
old New York.

26
The promising 
metropolis is proud
of its first fire 
engine, and the
young bloods of 
the town are eager
volunteer fire-fighters.

27
Young Washington Irving,
volunteer fireman, who
is about to light a 
flame of his own that
shall burn as long as 
books endure.

28
Bully Boy Brewster,
aspiring pugilist
and amateur smoke-
eater.

29
Lorenzo Delmonico,
who has abandoned
his milk route in
New Jersey to teach
New Yorkers that they
should not prefer
home-cooking.

30
Fitz Greene Halleck,
John Jacob Astor's
pleasure-loving
secretary.

31
Henry Brevoort, one
of New York's first
"men - about - town."

32
"Ale, oyster, coffee and
 the vegetable - - that
 will be twenty cents,
 gentlemen."

33
"Why, you have no
 idea how the cost of
 living has gone up!"

34
To Mr. John Jacob Astor,
who was born in Holland,
belong the titles of Piano
Agent, Fur Merchant,
Real Estate Dealer
and Leading Citizen.

35
Cornelius Vanderbilt,
who sails the ferry 
boat from the Battery
to Staten Island.

36
Chancellor Robert
Livingston, whose 
daughter is engaged
to marry the rising
young inventor, Robert
Fulton.

37
"We are here to ask
 your consideration of
 Mr. Fulton's latest
 invention--the steamboat."

38
"Mr. Astor, with another 
 $10,000 we can build a
 ship that will revolutionize
 the world!"

39
"My friends, the whole
 thing is an impractical
 dream. I invest my money
 in real estate."

40
"Why, Mr. Astor, I have
 mortgaged my Staten
 Island ferry to go in
 with Mr. Fulton."

41
"When you are penniless,
 Mr. Vanderbilt, remember
 what I told you."

42
"I am sorry, gentlemen,
 but I must hasten to
 Mr. Lawrence Delavan's
 for the reading of his
 stepfather's will."

43
"Larry Delavan will
 inherit a fortune of
 almost $1,000,000 - -
 perhaps he will invest
 $10,000."

44
The home of the 
wealthy Richard O'Day,
who died leaving no
apparent heir but his
stepson, Larry Delavan.

45
Larry Delavan, who
awaits but the
reading of a will to
take possession of
his stepfather's great
fortune.

46
Ariana du Puyster, who
has delayed a trip to
London because of her 
interest in Larry's 
fortunes.

47
Philip Schuyler,
leading banker of
the city, his wife
and daughter Betty.

48
"Larry, my boy, this
 little piece of paper
 will make you a very
 rich man."

49
"I, Richard O'Day, mindful of
 the generosity of my only
 brother who loaned me the
 money to come to America
 and make my fortune, do
 bequeath my entire estate to
 Patrick O'Day, the son of my
 said brother."

50
"And I nominate John Jacob
 Astor as sole executor and my
 stepson, Lawrence Delavan, as
 sole guardian of the said
 Patrick O'Day, the said Delavan
 to receive my house in 
 New York and $500 per month
 for his duties."

51
"If the said Patrick O'Day
 be not found within
 one year from the date
 of my death, my entire
 estate shall revert to
 my stepson, the afore-
 mentioned Lawrence
 Delavan."

52
 In Ireland - -
"the most distressful
 country that ever yet
 was seen" - - live the
 poverty-stricken
 relatives of the rich
        O'Day.

53
The eviction of poor
debtors is the favorite
occupation of the Irish
landlords of the time.

54
 MISS MARION 
   DAVIES
     as
Patricia O'Day.

55
"Shame on you - -
 raising such a rumpus
 and my poor little
 brother lying sick
 inside there!"

56
"Oh, sir, my rich
 uncle in America
 will help us, if
 you will only give
 us time."

57
"If I was dying I'd never
 be calling for the help
 of my brother who forgot
 me as soon as he got rich."

58
"My name is John O'Day.
 What is it you want?"

59
"I am a solicitor. Your
 brother has died and
 left his entire fortune
 to your son, Patrick
 O'Day."

60
"Master Patrick has
 only two months left in
 which to reach New York
 else the money goes to
 your uncle's stepson,
 Mr. Lawrence Delavan."

61
So that night
Patricia said
goodbye to the
land of her birth.

62
On the night of 
the last day of his
year of anxious
waiting, Larry Delavan
and his friends
celebrate the non-
appearance of the
heir from Ireland.

63
Mr. Robert Fulton,
the inventor, now
engaged in constructing
the Clermont, which
he hopes will be the
first steam driven
vessel.

64
"Mr. Fulton and I only
 stopped for a moment
 to make sure about your
 $10,000 to complete his
 steamboat."

65
"Have no further worry,
 for at midnight I come
 into my inheritance."

66
"Here's success to
 the Clermont!"

67
"Here's to the health 
        of Pat O'Day.
'Tis kind of him
        to stay away."

68
"This is young Patrick
 O'Day, Larry, who
 came in on my
 packet tonight."

69
"Will no gentleman in
 this wild America
 fetch a chair for an old
 man?"

70
"For the love of the
 saints, let's run before
 they find me out!"

71
"Keep a bold front,
 girl!"

72
"I am keeping a bold
 front - - it's the back
 of me that's trembling."

73
"Will you be denying
 my father a bed, and
 him sick from that
 terrible sea?"

74
"If there is anything
 you want, speak to my
 man Reilly."

75
"I could be doing with
 a bit of welcome from
 my only relative in
 America."

76
"With all my troubles
 I'll not bother you
 much - - I'll be out
 all night and asleep
 all day."

77
"Don't be going on 
 sprees. Sure, what's
 the good of a spree
 when it's over?"

78
"Go to bed, child!"

79
After the loss of his
inheritance, due to 
the arrival of Pat
O'Day, Larry Delavan
had difficulty in raising
the $10,000 for his
interest in Mr. Fulton's 
steamboat.

80
"Larry, are you sure
 you will be able to
 raise the money for
 the Clermont in time?"

81
"Gentlemen, I promise
 to raise $10,000 within
 the month."

82
"Mr. Larry, sir, couldn't
 I - - do something
 to - - to help - - "

83
"Sure, he's the most
 disappointing Irish lad
 for his years and size
 I have ever seen!"

84
"Boy, what in the
 world did you do
 in Ireland?"

85
"I used to play
 the harp."

86
The next day
Pat witnesses the
punishment of a
law breaker.

87
"Is that what they
 do to people who
 have taken money
 which doesn't belong
 to them?"

88
"Sure, that or the
 whipping post."

89
"That's Mr. Delavan's
 sweetheart, just back
 from London."

90
"My stay in London
 has taught me that
 we need refinement
 and culture. How I
 yearn for an English
 drawing room!"

91
"What an impossible
 little boy!"

92
"Sure, then, I'm not 
 the only one that's
 impossible."

93
"The Prince of Wales
 spoke to me as I was
 standing at the door
 and what do you think
 he said?"

94
"Sure, he probably
 said, 'Get out of
 my way!'"

95
"Won't I see you again
 before you go back to
 Haarlem?"

96
That night Pat
watches Larry
ponder over his
troubles.

97 [incomplete song lyrics interspersed with
    musical staff; superimposed on image]
you hear me call - in' When the dews are fall - in' I am

some wait - in' 'neath the weep - in' wil - low tree, Oh, my

is weary Wait - in' for you, dear - ie, Oh, __

hear me call-in' you to come to me! Do you come to me! __

98
"That's a pretty
 song, boy."

99
"Sure, if it's Mr. Fulton's
 money you are worry-
 ing about, sir, couldn't
 I be letting you have
 some of my inheritance?"

100
"There's nothing you
 could do to help me,
 boy."

101
"Come with us, Larry!
 There's a cockfight in
 Hoboken."

102
"Go to your father. He
 needs your kind attentions
 in his illness."

103
In the dark hour 
before dawn.

104
"My death is near
 upon me."

105
"Swear you will do all
 in your power to
 trick the last living
 Delavan!"

106
Time passes until 
the day before the 
momentous trial trip
of Fulton's steamboat,
the Clermont, when 
John Jacob Astor
receives a strange caller.

107
"Could I see Mr. Astor
 alone, privately, and
 promise you will
 never tell Larry I
 was here?"

108
"I want $10,000 of
 my money right
 away, please."

109
"I want the money to
 invest for Mr. Delavan
 in Mr. Fulton's steamboat."

110
"Steamboats! I will
 not let you gamble
 on silly inventions
 with that light-headed
 Larry Delavan."

111
"My boy, I am perfectly
 willing to let you
 invest $10,000 of your
 money in real estate
 around Grammercy Pond.
 That's sound business."

112
"How do you buy
 real estate?"

113
"Oh, it would be wonderful
 to do things like this
 all by myself!"

114
"Come with me tomorrow
 morning and I'll let
 you buy this property."

115
"I have great hopes
 for young O'Day. Some
 day he will be a real
 man of affairs."

116
Brevoort brings some
new and gay stories
to Larry's dinner
party that evening.

117
The Schuylers give a
splendid ball in honor
of Robert Fulton.

118
"Ariana, everybody is
 dying to hear you sing
 one of the new
 London songs."

119
"Sure, everybody will 
 be dying if she does
 sing it.

120
"Sure, you're not leaving
 while Miss du Puyster is
 singing her beautiful
 song?"

121
"Mind your business,
 you good-for-nothing
 Irishman!"

122
"Be careful not to
 interrupt the beautiful
 singing of Miss Ariana."

123
"Lad, I'm sorry I was
 harsh with you."

124
Then comes the 
eventful morning 
of August 7, 1807,
when all New York
turns out to laugh
at "Fulton's Folly."

125
"Here, boy, is a draft
 for $10,000."

126
"Sure, Mr. Astor, why
 not let me do this 
 all by myself?"

127
"Halleck! - - Halleck!"

128
"Mr. Halleck's down at
 the Clermont landing.
 I'll take the draft and
 meet him there."

129
"Very well - - and, Pat,
 before you know it,
 you will be a business
 man."

130
"Before you know it,
 I will be a business man."

131
"Well, Mr. Schuyler, would
 you give $10,000 for a
 third interest in the
 Clermont now?"

132
"Twice that amount - -
 now, Mr. Fulton!"

133
"Too late, Mr. Schuyler - -
 Mr. Delavan's $10,000
 will just clear us."

134
"And we will need it
 absolutely this afternoon,
 Larry."

135
"I'm afraid I won't be
 able to get the money
 for another week or so."

136
"I'm sorry, Delavan, but
 you must realize our
 position in this matter."

137
"I will give you $10,000
 in cash this afternoon
 for Mr. Delavan's share."

138
"I guess this is the end
 of the Delavans, Pat."

139
"Sure, it may be the
 end of the Delavans,
 but it's just the start
 of the O'Days!"

140
"Sure, Mr. Fulton, you
 can't give to Mr. Schuyler
 what you promised to
 Mr. Delavan, can you
 now?"

141
"But suppose I guarantee
 the payment of the
 money for Mr. Delavan's
 share?"

142
"Who's going to
 guarantee you?"

143
"Sure, Mr. Schuyler,
 since money talks
 the only conversation
 you can understand,
 listen to this."

144
"Mr. Astor's name is
 sufficient guaranty
 for us."

145
"Sure, where would I
 get the money except
 from my friend John
 Jacob Astor?"

146
"I don't know how to
 thank you, gentlemen,
 but I'll raise the 
 money in the next
 five days if I hang
 for it."

147
"After the way I've
 behaved toward you,
 Pat, I've got to admit
 you're a pretty decent
 youngster."

148
"Pat, stop it, you
 act like a girl."

149
"I may act like a girl,
 but you'll have to
 admit I am a pretty
 good business man."

150
So Robert Fulton's great
invention, destined to
revolutionize shipping
and inaugurate a new
era in the progress 
of the world, achieved
its first success on the
waters of the Hudson.

151
"After what you have
 done, boy, this ought
 to be your task."

152
The afternoon of the
Clermont's triumph
brings Larry Delavan
a gambler's chance to
redeem his promise
to his partners.

153
"Mr. Delavan, I want to
 know if you'll back
 my brother against the
 Hoboken Terror?"

154
"I've been training him
 myself, sir, and he's
 fit, he is!"

155
"Don't worry, Pat.
 I won't back Brewster.
 He's too light for the
 Terror."

156
"Who says I'm light
 for the Terror?"

157
"Tell them what I did
 to 'Fighting Bill Marsh'."

158
"But don't tell them
 what he did to me!"

159
"This man is no match
 for the Hoboken Terror.
 I'd give odds of five
 to one against him."

160
"I'll back you, Brewster,
 if you'll fight the
 Terror tonight at the
 firehouse."

161
"Sure, Mr. Larry, how
 can you bet when
 you have no money to
 bet with?"

162
"I still have this house.
 Will you accept that
 as security for the
 wager?"

163
"Couldn't you slip me
 into the firehouse
 unbeknownst to Mr. Larry?"

164
"'Tis only a smart, clever
 man like yourself I'd
 be asking to do me
 such a favor."

165
The night of the 
celebrated pugilistic
encounter between Bully
Boy Brewster and the
Hoboken Terror.

166
Bunny, who is one
half of little old
New York's night
police force.

167
"You can't bring
 that lad in here.
 Minors ain't allowed
 by law."

168
"If you'll let me stay,
 I'll sing you a song of
 old Ireland."

169
"Give us a jig, lad,
 'Rory O'Moore'."

170
"Oh, Mr. Larry, will
 you not drop this
 foolishness before
 you lose the house?"

171
Percival Sweet,
undisputed champion
of Hoboken.

172
"Reilly, do you think
 Bully Boy Brewster 
 can whip the Terror?"

173
"My word, isn't anybody 
 going to bet on Bully
 Boy Brewster?"

174
"Didn't I tell you?"

175
"I'm just leadin'
 him on!"

176
"Fire!"

177
"FIRE!!"

178
"FIRE!!!"

179
"You rang that alarm
 bell to save your
 brother!"

180
"Sure I rang the bell.
 It was the only way
 to save Mr. Larry
 from losing everything
 he owns."

181
"You says I done it!
 Wait! I'll tell that
 crowd who done it!"

182
"We'd better get out
 before that mob gets
 started."

183
"If you want to know
 who rang the false
 alarm, ask Larry
 Delavan."

184
"Them as want satisfaction,
 follow me!"

185
"Sure, my only thought
 was to save this house
 for you."

186
"What you really did
 was to make me out
 a cheap trickster!"

187
"I'll not let them
 think me a coward
 as well as a cheat."

188
"Throw him in the
 river - - hang him!"

189
"It's me you want - -
 I rang the bell!"

190
"Stop! For the love
 of heaven, stop! I'm
 a girl!"

191
"Gentlemen, would you
 mind leaving me alone
 with Pat?"

192
"I hope he will be all
 right for he's a game
 little fellow."

193
"I'm not a game little
 fellow - - I'm just
 a girl."

194
"Oh, Mr. Larry, you
 don't know how sorry
 I am."

195
"Everything is all right,
 Pat. I know I will
 much prefer being
 the guardian of a girl."

196
"But you won't be
 anybody's guardian,
 Mr. Larry. The money
 is all yours now. You
 can pay Mr. Fulton
 and everything."

197
"That isn't the reason
 I'm glad you are a
 girl, Pat."

198
Ten o'clock next
morning and Pat
has not yet appeared.

199
"Miss Schuyler brought
 over a lot of clothes
 and the two of them
 are locked in."

200
"Pat, you're wonderful!"

201
"I have an order for
 the arrest of a girl
 who has sometime been
 known as Patrick O'Day."

202
Threatened by the
Town Council with
two years in prison,
Pat tells the story of
her impersonation
of her brother.

203
"- - and we thought our
 sorrows were over when
 we took ship from Queens-
 town, but we had storm
 after storm and my
 brother grew weaker and
 weaker - -"

204
"Pat, Pat, stay with
 me, Pat!"

205
"The God of vengeance
 has not left me
 defenseless against the
 Delavans!"

206
"You shall be the weapon
 of my revenge."

207
"You shall be your
 brother Patrick and
 claim his inheritance."

208
"Who will be the
 wiser if it is you
 who have died and
 will be buried in
 the morning?"

209
"The next morning
 I said my last goodbye
 to my brother."

210
"Remember your oath!"

211
"What could I do
 except what my
 father made me
 swear to do?"

212
"Well, gentlemen, we
 have heard our prison-
 er's story. What is
 your decision?"

213
"We think the prisoner
 must be fined - - but
 we have decided to
 pay the fine ourselves."

214
"One of my ships is
 in the harbor waiting,
 and I think it best
 that Pat return to
 London until people
 forget a little."

215
When the last
trunk was packed.

216
"Pat, it will be very
 lonesome in this old
 house for Reilly and
 me without you."

217
"Sure, Mr. Larry, it is
 I that will be lonesome
 without the old house,
 and Reilly and - - 
 and you."

218
"Then, Pat dear, why
 not stay and be the
 mistress of the house
 and the little wife
 of its master?"

219
"But, Larry, Mr. Astor
 says I've got to go to
 London."

220
"Reilly, pack my boxes!
 I am going on the ship 
 with Miss Patricia!"

221
"Sure, I did that an
 hour ago, Mr. Larry.
 I knew you wouldn't
 be letting Miss Patricia
 go alone."

222
THE END




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