The Deerslayer

[English-language titles from the 1923
 American release of a 1920 German film]

1 [scrolling text]
The literature of this nation pre-
sents no other character that 
possesses, for the youth of the
land, the beguiling charm and
attraction of Deerslayer; nor is it
likely there could be found in
the literature of the world a
character whom the American
youth could better take for their
inspiration.

Homely were his virtues; To be
truthful; to be faithful; to be
helpful. Every rising sun found
him ready, every setting sun
witnessed his victory over the
day - richer for having given,
stronger for his weariness, braver
that he had not run from duty.
His physical courage brought him 
fame, his moral courage wrapped
him in an aura of glory.

WHEREFORE, it seems fit and 
well to Dedicate this Work to
that Mighty Band of Tomorrow's
Men

THE  BOY  SCOUTS  OF
      AMERICA

  (God bless 'em!)


2
"Our hero, the Deerslayer, an
 orphaned boy, had been
 adopted and raised by a tribe 
 of Delaware Indians. His boy-
 hood friend was Chingachgook,
 son of the chief."

3
"The period of the story is 1740,
 and the scenes are laid in the
 upper reaches of New York
 State. At that date the whole
 region was a vast wilderness, and
 a man's only protection was his
 rifle."

4
"The story of The Deerslayer
 is too long to read in an
 hour, so I am going to tell
 parts of it in my own 
 words."

5
"On this bright day Glim-
 merglass Lake sparkled
 in the midst of the
 wilderness."

6
Chief Rivenoak, head of a
 band of Iroquois Indians, in
camp near the lake, is secretly in 
league with the French army to
capture Fort William and drive 
out all English settlers.

7
Nearby, journeying to
   meet Chingachgook,
whose promised bride has
been stolen from her tribe,
the DEERSLAYER - -

8
- - joins Hurry Harry, a
rover, noted for being 
quicker in action than
thought, and inclined to
tell too much in too little 
time.

9
"Where must you meet
 this lovelorn chief of
 the Delawares?"

10
"At the white rock near the
 foot of Glimmerglass Lake.
 This part of the country is
 strange to me but I'm told it
 is common territory for Indians
 to hunt and fish through."

11
 "COMMON 
TERRITORY?"

12
"Old Tom Hutter, whose two
 daughters I've been telling you
 about, claims it's his lake and
 his land. And since I want to
 marry Judith, his oldest daughter,
 I think he's right."

13
Catamount, a Delaware Indian,
 has stolen Watawah, the love 
of Chingachgook, and fled with
her to the Iroquois camp, where
he has been adopted as a son by 
old Rivenoak.

14
"Watawah, marry me - I too
 am now the son of a 
 chief!"

15
"You stole me from my people
 but I left my heart in the
 wigwams of the Delawares.
 Watawah belongs to Ching-
 achgook."

16
"You see, Deerslayer, the Iroquois
 killed the woman Hutter was to
 marry, and he then adopted her
 two little girls - who still be-
 lieve he is their true father.
 The Indians had burnt his home,
 and I helped him build the
 'castle' in the lake."

17
"To kill a man from a safe
 place is murder, Harry. I
 can't see a white man do it
 - a savage knows no better."

18
"Pshaw, Deerslayer! Suppose
 a' Indian is a man - ain't it a
 scientific fact that he ain't a 
 hu-man? He's only a crittur.
 Huh!"

19
Years ago the necessity
 for a strong isolated
fortification against Indian
attacks inspired Hutter to
build the "castle".

20
"There's old Tom Hutter
 working away at his traps.
 I'll bet his two girls ain't
 far away."

21
Judith Hutter, noted
 through all the region
for her high spirits, her
gay nature and masculine
conquests.

22
Hetty is said to be simple-
  minded, but is possessed 
of splendid traits in direct
contrast to those of her sister
Judith.

23
"Judith!"

24
Even in this moment of
 their introduction the
wayward heart of Judith finds
its master in the modest
Deerslayer.

25
"This is Deerslayer, Tom, an
 honest man - if there be
 such a crittur."

26
"I guess you're just in time, Harry.
 I've been warned by an Indian
 runner that the French and
 Indians are getting together, and
 to take my girls for safety to
 Fort William."

27
"Pull Harry - PULL!"

28
Fort William, an English
 garrison, at some distance
from the lake, is the only
protection afforded the set-
tlers of the region.

29
General William Monroe,
  in command.

30
"Me come tell you Injuns join
 French. Me tell Hutter on
 lake - bring girls here to 
 fort. He say Damn Monroe!"

31
The spirit of revenge
  ever goading him,
Hutter plans with Harry to
steal into Rivenoak's camp.

32
"I do not ask you to join us.
 I have a personal score to
 settle with the Indians which
 Harry knows. I have vowed
 to take every opportunity
 to make them pay."

33
"Why don't you let the com-
 mander of the fort settle
 your differences with the
 Indians."

34
"I will go with you to
 watch your canoe."

35
"The warpath is no place
 for an old man, Hutter.
 Turn back to your daugh-
 ters who need you."

36
"Deerslayer, I'll tend to
 my business - you tend
 to the canoe."

37
"Keep off! Keep off! Back
 to the 'castle' and take care
 of my girls!"

38
"After waiting a while in hope
 that the captives might escape,
 Deerslayer, deciding it safer
 to take the extra canoe to the
 'castle', returns to get it."

39
"Two canoe - one for you
 - one for me."

40
"No, Mingo, you own
 neither, and neither shall
 you have."

41
"Good. White brother young 
 - old in wisdom - some-
 time be chief."

42
"Deerslayer name for boy.
 You got big eye. Right
 name is Hawkeye! Hawk-
 eye! Ugh, now I die!"

43
The French and Indians, under
 Gen. Montcalm, aware of the
temporary weakness of Fort
William due to Lieut. Warley's
departure for the lake, seize the
moment for its attack.

44
"There's no use concealing
 it. Your father and Harry
 are in the hands of the
 Iroquois."

45
"When the moon sets high I
 will leave to meet Chingach-
 gook. If he is at the appointed
 place, we will come back to
 plan the rescue of your father
 and Harry."

46
 Ignorant of the treacher-
 ous designs of the Indians,
Gen. Monroe has set out to
join Warley on the way to
the lake.

47
"As the moment for his meet-
 ing with Chingachgook ap-
 proaches Deerslayer, with
 the Hutter girls, proceeds
 towards the old white rock."

48
"So the love of Chingach-
 gook is named Watawah?
 May I ask you, Deerslayer,
 if your own heart is free?"

49
"My heart! The wilderness
 holds my heart, Judith. I
 love the earth - beautiful
 beyond compare except
 where civilization has
 marred it."

50
And the keen eyes of
 Chingachgook recog-
nize Deerslayer on the
"ark".

51
"Frankly, I stopped his tongue.
 My own principle is never to
 speak ill of a woman for two
 reasons: First, because what I
 might say is not true; second,
 because what I might say is true.
 In either case, I would do harm
 to a woman."

52
"The water moves."

53
"White girl read Love your
 enemy, do good for evil.
 She say same Law for red-
 man as white."

54
"Big book - good words -
 'love your enemies'."

55
"Old white man read white man's
 big book. He know big words.
 Let him explain how and what
 for he come to Iroquois camp.
 Maybe he love me too heap big!
 Ugh!

56
"Your tribe killed this girl's
 mother, Rivenoak. Ask your-
 self what brought me here!"

57
"Hetty, dear, you meant
 well. But Injuns ain't
 hu-man!"

58
"Come, Red Fox, take
 good white girl back
 home."

59
"Two-tailed beast! Big
 omen! Good for Iro-
 quois! It do!"

60
"Judith! This little toy
 will do the trick."

61
"Take this to your chief
 and tell him that Deer-
 slayer sends it in exchange
 for his prisoners."

62
"Chingachgook, the girl Watawah
 whispered me a message to you.
 When the moon is risen above
 the treetops, she will be near
 the white rock on the river
 bank."

63
"Good - Chingachgook
 and his friend will be
 there."

64
"Deerslayer! Why do you
 not stay here - with me -
 and my sister? Why risk
 your life for one you do
 not love?"

65
"Judith, perhaps I understand you.
 Perhaps not. Still, if your re-
 gard for me means so much to
 you, surely my friendship for
 Chingachgook means something
 to him - and me."

66
"I dare say Chingachgook could 
 rescue Watawah alone. But
 Judith, he has counted on me -
 and could you be faithless to
 one who had counted on you?"

67
"Don't be offended, my
 friend. Judith, being beau-
 tiful, is used to having her
 own way - with men."

68
"Warley, the Indians have done
 their work fiendishly well.
 Let us be on the move before
 harm comes to Hutter and his
 girls."

69
When the "two-tailed
 beast" has worked its
magic on the superstitions
of Chief Rivenoak.

70
Deerslayer accepts
[?]
resignation.

71
"I am Deerslayer, called 
 Hawkeye by one of your
 braves before his spirit
 started for the happy hunt-
 ing grounds."

72
"Hawkeye has stolen my wife.
 He will bring her back or
 his scalp will hang to dry
 out in my wigwam."

73
"Speech is useless with a liar,
 Catamount! Your chief, as well
 as every man who hears me
 speak, knows that you are a
 liar!"

74
Hutter, attempting to
  help Deerslayer,
makes matters worse.

75
"Your aim was good, Hutter,
 but that bullet's going to do
 Deerslayer as much harm as
 the girl it struck!"

76
"Is this 'love your enemy'?
 Ugh! White man pray to
 great good God but laugh
 with Devil in Hell! Glad
 I am redman."

77
 It has suited the plan
   of the cunning Rive-
noak to release Deerslayer
under a promise which he
believes will never be kept.

78
"Rivenoak released me on my
 promise to send him Watawah,
 or, failing, return myself three
 hours before sunset."

79
"Iroquois moccasin. Not
 much long in water.
 How it get there?"

80
"Come on in. All's
 safe."

81
"Pull away! It's a
 trap!"

82
Scalped alive!

83
"Poor father!"

84
"No - I'm not - your -
 father! In the chest
 - look - -"

85
"And so the mortal remains
 of old Tom Hutter are buried
 in the lake which he has
 claimed for his own."

86
"God rest his soul!"

87
Judith seeks to solve
 the mystery of her 
parentage.

88
"O my brother, help me! For I
 so love this Judith - whose fickle
 heart, they say, is as the bow-
 string, stretched by any arm that
 will! Forgive me, dear God, if 
 I speak unkindly!"

89
"My friend, my brother, what can
 poor Injun say? Deerslayer,
 just be true to your own best
 nature, and you'll be true to Him
 and all the world as well. That's
 the truth."

90
"O mother in Heaven! Would
 to God you had been with me
 always, and poor, dear Hetty!
 It might have been so differ-
 ent - with me!"

91
Three hours before
  sunset.

92
"Deerslayer, I think you're
 a plum' fool to keep
 your word with them sav-
 ages! You're a-goin' to
 be massey-creed!"

93
"Harry, no man's a fool to
 keep his word - to any-
 body. He's just - honest. Of
 course that's a point too fine
 for your understanding."

94
"You've no one to care for
 you now, Judith and if
 you'll accept me for a 
 husband -"

95
"I cannot become your
 wife, Harry."

96
"Then you've promised to
 marry one of those flaunt-
 ing scarlet coated officers
 of the fort!"

97
"Yes, Harry. It is true that
 I have promised Lieut.
 Warley to marry him.
 That's why I cannot
 marry you."

98
"Judith, I'm going to break
 through these Indian lines and
 run to Fort William for help.
 If I don't make it - well - I'm
 as crazy as Deerslayer!"

99
"The man you slew - by the
 canoes - left a widow. She is
 sleeping in her lodge. Go in
 there, call yourself her husband,
 and you shall become an Iroquois.
 If not - -"

100
"Listen, Rivenoak; I AM A
 WHITE MAN. I cannot hope
 for you ever to understand
 WHAT that means to a WHITE
 MAN. I shall marry no Indian!"

101
"God speed you, Harry.
 Tell Warley to hasten."

102
"Good! 'Love your enemy'.
 Same law for redman and
 white man. But not same
 wife. Ugh! You kill my
 brave - then I kill you at
 stake! Ugh!"

103
"You stay here. We go
 to rescue Deerslayer."

104
"Go Hetty! Read to Rivenoak.
 Anything to delay them till
 the soldiers come!"

105
"Tom Hutter's daughters are alone
 on the 'castle', he's dead, and
 Deerslayer's in Rivenoak's
 hands. Hurry, or they'll all be
 massy-creed!"

106
With a wild idea of 
 playing upon Rive-
noak's superstition, - -

107
- Judith, aware of her
 remarkable resemblance to
 her mother, puts on the
 blood-stained dress and
 comes to the camp.

108
"Behold, Rivenoak, the spirit
 of one you slew years ago,
 sent by the Great God to
 command that you release
 this prisoner!"

109
"Judith! Sister! How
 beautiful you are!"

110
"Ugh! So you lie! You
 are this girl's sister -
 not a spirit - sent by
 your God! Ugh!"

111
"Revenge for Fort
 William!"

112
But no victory, however great,
 can ever repay in full for 
the loss of one dearly beloved;
and so now, the cruel fact that
Hetty lies dying, her body
pierced with arrows, turns the
shouts of victory to sobs of grief.

113
"Warley, old Hutter kept his
 secret well. I never knew they
 were my children. I have long
 repented my shameful desertion
 of their mother - I must expiate
 that act, if God wills I may."

114
"Oh, Harry, beloved of my heart!
 I have loved you - dearly. But
 you - you have - never known!
 It has been - my secret! Here-
 after - Harry - please be - more
 like - Deerslayer - -"

115
"Judith - dearest sister -
 I see our - mother! It is
 getting dark, Judith!
 Farewell - Judith - -"

116
"Warley! Warley! God's
 hand is upon me!"

117
The sun is setting. The
 soldiers are gone. The
dead are with their Maker.
And the old "castle" on
Glimmerglass Lake is de-
serted forever.

118
"Ah, Deerslayer! Do you
 know enough of my life
 - my disposition - to hate
 me?"

119
"Hate you, Judith? Why,
 I love you. In this fair
 land, with you, my life
 would be most happy.
 But - -"

120
"Deerslayer, let us then
 marry, and abide here
 forever!"

121
"Judith, I cannot wound you! I
 must not speak my mind - it
 would hurt you - hurt me more!
 But - there, standing in the
 copse - is one who now waits
 upon you to join him - and keep
 your pledge to marry him!
 Farewell, Judith!"

122
"You - you are - right - Deer-
 slayer! I understand how -
 you must feel. And - farewell,
 Deerslayer! My heart I leave
 with you!"

123
"Beautiful Judith! You
 have made me most
 happy!"

124
"You must help me, Warley,
 for - for I - I inherit the
 traits of a fickle father -"

125
"Farewell! Farewell for-
 ever - to all that might
 have been!"

126
"My friends, I shall not
 grieve for what might
 have been. Let us rejoice
 for all that is and what
 betides!"

127
"That, fellows, is the tale of
 MAN. Deerslayer's was the 
 heart of a real Scout. For my-
 self, I propose that some day we
 gift a monument of granite rock
 to his memory!"


The
   End



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