Beau Brummel

1 
Nowhere in all history can
 be found a more amazing
character than George Bryan
Brummel, the friend of
Princes, the arbiter of
fashion and the social ruler
of England during the 
reign of George III.

2
And nowhere in all fiction
can be found more romance
than was crowded into the life
of this penniless commoner,
whose natural charm and
studied insolence made him
the greatest dandy of all
time - the immortal "Beau"
        Brummel.

3
It was in the year 1792
that the greatest personages in
England were assembled
for the wedding of a
tradesman's daughter.

4
The bridegroom, Lord
Alvanley, Colonel of the
Tenth Hussars, - offering
rank and position at court
in fair exchange for wealth.

	Lord Alvanley ... William Humphrey

5
The bride, Maid Margery.

	 ... Mary Astor.

6
Just a young man of no
importance - a Captain of
the Tenth Hussars.

George Bryan Brummel - 
         ... John Barrymore.

7
"I did not think to see
 you wearing a bridal 
  gown for another."

8
"You know how they 
 forced me to give 
     you up!"

9
His Royal Highness,
George, Prince of Wales.

10
The Prince of Wales.

	 ... Willard Louis.

11
Her Royal Highness,
 Frederica Charlotte,
Duchess of York, sister -
in-law of the Prince of
Wales.

	 ... Irene Rich.

12
"My dear one, I cannot
 ask you to come with 
        me."

13
"And yet - how can
  I let you go?"

14
"Take me with you!"

15
"My heart is all I have to 
 offer - and that I lay in
 the hollow of your little
          hand."

16
Margery's mother, ambitious,
   relentless.

	 ... Clarissa Selwyn.

17
"Would you ruin us for 
    this nobody?"

18
"Only a person come to 
 wish my daughter luck on 
   her wedding night."

19
"Perhaps this sixpence
 may bring him luck."

20
"The Prince is waiting!
 Is His Royal Highness
    to be insulted?"

21
Revenge was all he thought 
of now. He would use his 
charm, wit and personal
appearance in a game
against the society which
had robbed him of his love.

22
At the 'Sign of the Hawk
and Chicken', the Prince of
Wales entertained the
Officers of his regiment on
the eve of their departure
  for Manchester.

23
"Lord Henry, I hold a
 number of your I.O.U's."

 Lord Henry Stanhope
       ... Richard Tucker

24
"I shall take pleasure in
 destroying them - if you
 will give me your place
 next to His Royal Highness."

25
The landlord's wife.

	 ... Betty Brice.

26
"Egad, sir, what a beautiful
           woman!"

27
"Your Royal Highness may
 be able to hide in that 
       closet."

28
"My good man, I did not 
     ring for you."

29
"Your wife has just been 
 kissed - she has never 
 been kissed by a gentleman 
         before."

30
"Did my wife have the 
 honor, sir, of being 
 insulted by you - -"

31
"- - or the Prince of 
       Wales?"

32
"You can say anything you 
 like about the Prince -"

33
"- - but be careful of 
   my reputation."

34
"By George! You're a
 better beau than I am -
        George!"

35
"By George! I believe 
   I am - George!"

36
"I should like to ask Your 
 Royal Highness' permission
 to resign from the Army."

37
"Have you no wish to 
 serve your country?"

38
"Not in Manchester, sir."

39
"Your Royal Highness
 would not be there."

40
"Come, Beau Brummel,
 wish your brother officers 
 a pleasant sojourn in
      Manchester."

41
"Impossible, Your Royal
       Highness!"

42
"We would not be there."

43
  Thus the Beau staked 
his fortune on the favor of 
a Prince, who in 1811 ruled 
   England as Regent.

44
His house in London was
the rendezvous of the smart 
world. The dandies of the 
town flocked to his 
dressing room to learn
the latest scandal or the 
     latest style.

45
As a protest against the 
tax on powder, the Beau
had set the style for
    natural hair.

46
"I could not think of
 trusting my top hair to
 anyone but Jean - -"

47
"- - or my temples to
 anyone but Henri - -"

48
"- - or the tout ensemble
 to anyone but Jacques."

49
"Mortimer, when is 
 your master going 
   to pay me?"

Mortimer .. Alec Francis

50
"I have no master,
 Mr. Abrahams, I
 am a Gentleman's
   gentleman."

Abrahams .. Roland Rushton

51
"His Royal Highness, the 
    Prince of Wales."

52
"Parkyns, Mr. Brummel
 never allows anyone to 
   raise his voice!"

53
"This person has un-
 doubtedly called to ask
 for financial assistance."

54
"You will oblige me 
 greatly by leaving my 
    house at once."

55
"Will you arrange a little 
 supper for tonight, George,
 and invite some friends 
 of the female persuasion,
    - say at eight?"

56
"Make it eight-thirty."

57
"Very well, George - now 
 won't you fix me one of
   your new cravats?"

58
"The snuffbox I gave him!
 Then he still 'thinks' of
      me a little!"

Lady Hester Stanhope 
		... Carmel Myers

59
"Mr. Brummel thinks
 only of you, Lady
      Hester."

60
"George, dear, I could
 not stand your neglect!"

61
"Your husband is in
  the next room."

62
"How can you doubt me -
 you know my heart is in
 the hollow of your little
          hand."

63
"Lady Hester came here
 hoping for a glimpse of 
  Your Royal Highness."

64
"Please note that I will
 see Lady Hester tomorrow
        at four."

65
To deal with the infatuat-
ion of a woman, the
jealousy of a husband and
the caprices of a Prince
    required tact.

66
"My dear Lord Henry, I
 fear I shall not be able to
 come to your house again."

67
"You see - I am in love
    with your wife."

68
At Dowling Green.

69
"I will divorce my wife,
 and I shall expect you 
     to marry her."

70
"What a pity Lord Henry
 is such a poor shot!"

71
"My dear Lady Hester, will
 you do me the honor to
 marry me when you are 
        free?"

72
"But - if you accept me -
 I shall hate you like the 
         devil!"

73
"A divorce and remarriage
 would hurt my position 
       at court."

74
"What do we care for 
 scandal? You do love 
        me!"

75
"I love you more in 
 this moment than 
 ever before --"

76
"-- when I tell you
 that I have never loved
     you at all."

77
"Fool! Do you think I care
 about anything but my 
 own position at court?"

78
"Thank you. You have 
 saved me from doing 
 something commonplace."

79
Yuletide at York House -
when the Beau held sway
as the first gentleman of 
       Europe.

80
"How do you like
   my coat?"

81
"I say, George, do you call
   that thing a coat?"

82
"What would become of 
 you if anything should 
 happen to your friendship 
    with the Prince?"

83
"I should cut the Prince 
 and make the Duchess 
     the fashion."

84
"Mr. Brummel, you are 
 wasting yourself. You
 have the qualities of a
 great leader, yet you
 choose to play the part 
   of court jester."

85
"I am a nobody without
 rank or fortune. I attract
 attention by insolence and
    hold it by scandal."

86
"Things would have been 
 different, Your Royal
 Highness, had I known 
 the tenderness of a real 
        woman."

87
"A woman to sit beside 
 my fire, to move among
 my things - to bless them 
     with her touch."

88
"A woman like Your 
 Royal Highness!"

89
"Mr. Brummel treats you
  as a brother-in-law."

90
Because of the growing 
coldness of the Prince - the
Beau decided to take his 
own advice and make the 
Duchess the fashion, so
invited her to one of his
charmingly indiscreet
  midnight suppers.

91
"Her Royal Highness - -
  the Duchess of York."

92
"I did not come to 
 reproach you, but
 only to warn you."

93
"You have an enemy at
 Court - someone I dare
 not name. He has heard
 of your appointment with
 the Duchess and threatens
   to tell the Prince."

94
"What do I care for 
     enemies?"

95
"How can I make you
    understand?"

96
"You must listen to me -
 I have loved but one
  woman in my life."

97
"I loved you then - I
 love you now - I'll
  love you always!"

98
"But - the Lady Hester?"

99
"I was lonely - she was
        amusing."

100
"And - the Duchess?"

101
"I was lonely - she 
     was kind."

102
"Lord Alvanley, you've
 always wanted this
 tailor's dummy - take
         him."

103
"The Beau's false chivalry
 has deceived many a
 woman. I would be more
      faithful."

104
"I place my heart in 
 the hollow of your 
   little hand."

105
"Could you forget 
 him if I sent him 
   to France -"

106
"- as Ambassador?"

107
"Lady Alvanley, I will see 
    you to your chair."

108
"I promised myself
  that pleasure."

109
"I had forgotten, George,
   you were a Prince."

110
"Prince or no Prince,
 you are wasting your
        time."

111
The Prince - incited by 
the Beau's enemies and
resenting his insolence -
gave a dinner to a group 
of intimates at Carlton
        House.

112
"Duchess, the Beau loves 
 too well - and for too short
     a time. Beware!"

113
"You are fortunate, George.
 No one ever tells a woman 
    to beware of you."

114
"I have decided to send my
 good friend, Mr. Brummel,
 to France, as Ambassador."

115
"Frankly, we are tired of
 our dear Beau's scandals
 - but scandal is all the
     rage in France."

116
"What a success Your 
 Royal Highness would 
   have in France."

117
"Come, my dear, tell
 Mr. Brummel you'll be
 happy to see him leave
      for France."

118
"You have been drinking
 George - control yourself!"

119
"I fear I must call my
 carriage. Wales, ring
      the bell!"

120
The Mall - where the world
of fashion waited to see
of the Prince would carry
his quarrel into the open.

121
"Sup with me after the
 play tonight, Lord Byron.
 I want all my good friends
         with me."

122
"Who's your fat
    friend?"

123
"We've waited long enough
 for our money. Now we'll
   put him in prison."

124
The game had been played
and could never be played
        again.

125
"I have come to say good-
 bye, Lady Alvanley. I am
     going to Calais."

126
"My creditors have promised 
 me a free lodging in jail."

127
"I shall be quite fashionable
 in Calais - spending my 
 time between London
      and Paris."

128
"I will be honest with 
 you. The Beau's day 
      is over."

129
"I am the same poor 
 nobody who left this 
 garden on your wedding 
       night --"

130
"-- only more poor,
 more hopeless, more than
   ever your lover."

131
The Dover coach.

132
"This was all I could get 
    away with, sir."

133
Soon London forgot to 
talk about the "Two Georges"
- for one had become King
of England - and the
        other -

134
A great day came when 
the streets of Calais were 
decked with flags - the 
city was in gala mood -

135
- for the King of England
was passing through.

136
"I had hoped to reach 
 home before His Majesty's
 arrival. What time is it?"

137
"I understand, Mortimer,
 we cannot eat our watch
   and have it too."

138
"Does this come with
 Mr. Brummel's apologies?"

139
"Please, Your Majesty!
  Pity and forgive!"

140
"He is ill - broken -
 near to starving!"

141
"Byng, lend me 100."

142
"Return this money to 
 His Majesty with my 
    compliments."

143
"It is your last service for 
  me. You are dismissed!"

144
That night, for the first 
time, the Beau served 
       himself.

145
"I saw what happened at 
 the Inn today. I could 
     not stay away."

146
"My garret is heaven,
 since you have climbed
       so high."

147
"You never wrote in all 
 these years. Have you 
  forgotten, George?"

148
"You know my husband 
        died."

149
"Will you marry me, 
      George?"

150
"I am old, and changed,
  and tired of life."

151
"I think I am even tired 
        of love."

152
Years are long! And a
mind broken by the weight
of loneliness and privation,
found refuge in the prison
hospital of Bon Saveur.

153
Death kills but once -
Life kills many times.

154
And Mortimer, who had
been sending money from
England, came one day.

155
"Sir, the King of England,
 your friend George -
       is dead."

156
"Sir, Lady Margery is
      very ill."

157
"Mortimer!"

158
"Mortimer, my guests should 
 arrive at eight o'clock."

159
"But I told His Royal
 Highness to make it
    eight-thirty."

160
"Margery!"

161
"Mortimer, please seat the
       Lady Margery."

162
"You will not leave me, 
       Margery?"

163
"Were it the last drop in 
 the cup of life, I would
 pause to drink - to you."

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