America

[a.k.a. "America or Love and Sacrifice"]

1
The story of the sacrifice made for
freedom in the American Revolution
is that of a civil war between two
groups of English people; one group,
the Americans, being merely Eng-
   lishmen who settled on the
       American Continent.

2
The government which Canada and
Australia now enjoy was absolutely
denied to America through the
stubborn and false ideals of the
autocratic powers guiding the hand
   of King George the Third.

3
The trouble began when England
taxed her American colonies to help
defray the expenses of the French
and Indian War. The Colonies, not
represented in the English Parlia-
  ment, objected to taxation
    without representation.

4
The village of Lexington, in
  Massachusetts, where the 
      sacrifice began.

5
Buckman Tavern.

6
The home of a poor young farmer,
NATHAN HOLDEN, some
distance from Lexington, on the
road to Boston.

7
Nathan Holden, (whose ances-
tors fought with Cromwell),
a noted express rider of the
day, sometimes carrying des-
patches as far as the sister
colony of Virginia - a comrade
      of Paul Revere.

8
And dreams he of the time
  when express riding to
Virginia, by chance he met
the famous belle, Miss Nancy
Montague.

9
And though she was of 
  high degree, far far
above his station -

10
Afterwards, he swore -
  "Love may come and love 
    may go,
And sigh like the wind from tree 
  to tree,
But I shall love no more, no more,
Till this fair maid come back to 
  me!"

11
Williamsburg, capital 
of Virginia.

12
In Virginia there were a few
  families descended from the 
English nobility. They lived like
princes on vast estates. Perhaps
the most important of these was
the Montague family - the Mon-
tague estate on the James River.

13
Often with gay parties,
  but tonight - -

14
The Montagues are
  tenderly devoted to
one another.

15
The visitor, Colonel George
Washington, descended from 
the Washingtons of Sulgrove
Manorhouse, Northampton-
shire, England, was always a
       good listener.

16
Nancy Montague - the cause
 of Nathan Holden's youthful
dreams - had just returned
from her presentation at Court
in London, where she was the
reigning belle.

17
Charles Montague, just returned 
from England with the latest 
fads. Despite his foppery, he is
the most dangerous swordsman,
and one of the best shots in
          Virginia.
 
18
"Son, it is time you were
concerning yourself with
something more important
than London fashions."

19
"Oh, father, DON'T
chide him!"

20
"Colonel George, it is whis-
pered that, if there is any
trouble in America, you are
likely to stand against our 
King."

21
"I shall always try to stand
against injustice, Miss Nancy,
but I still have faith in 
England's justice to English-
men that there shall be no 
conflict between the Colonies
     and their Mother."

22
"Whatever happens, we
are always your friends,
Colonel George."

23
In the court of King George
the Third were evil counselors
who strengthened the King's
belief in the wisdom of kingly
  power to mean absolute
        autocracy.

24
King George the Third, - who
defied public opinion and be-
lieved in personal rule, looked
upon America as a rebel colony
  of Englishmen who wanted
    more than he thought
     was good for them.

25
In the British House
   of Parliament.

26
William Pitt, England's greatest 
commoner, one of a great line 
of Englishmen who have main-
tained the spirit of freedom for
the world, comes from his sick-
  bed to defend the American 
          Colonies.

27
"I see not one single American
in this great hall. If they have
no representation here, what
right have we to tax them.
Remember, America is the son
- - not the bastard - - of
England."

28
In the King's Closet. Perhaps
Sir Francis Bernard, Gover-
nor of Massachusetts, was
mainly responsible in creating
the misunderstanding between
the King and his Colonists
in America, these Colonies
which still called England
       their home.

29
The King, as well as a certain
group around him, failed to
understand the spirit of the
Colonists who still felt a great 
  attachment for the Mother 
           Country.

30
"They have no right to refuse
to pay this tax - they are our
flesh and blood and as such
owe us allegiance. If other
means fail - the bayonet!"

31
At the Green Dragon Tavern,
  in Boston. Here resistance
to what they considered
usurption of their rights had
been organized by the two 
leaders, Samuel Adams and
John Hancock.

32
His Majesty put power into
the angry hands of Governor
Bernard, so Boston's port is
closed, her people out of 
   work and starving.

33
Nathan Holden was a Minute 
Man and also a member of 
the Sons of Liberty.

34
The Boston Committee of
  Public Safety sends Hol-
den to Virginia with news of
this terrible blow at American
liberty.

35
The Montagues leave for
 the House of Burgesses,
where the legislature is in 
session.

36
Nathan Holden carries the 
 alarming news that Boston,
an American city, is now under
subjugation, as though it were a
conquered province.

37
The House of 
 Burgesses.

38
The Montagues arrive.

39
"Oh, there is Colonel
Washington - -"

40
"Ah, what happiness to
marry such a man!"

41
Nathan is determined
  that the legislature
shall hear his news from
Boston.

42
"Oh, that's the bold young 
man from Boston!"

43
The House receives the
   news of Boston's 
plight.

44
"Sir, you are wrong. I, too, am
a Virginian, but first I owe
allegiance to my King."

45
  "Sit down, you Tory!"
Note: At this time "Tories"
signified those, born in
America, whose sympathies
were against the American.

46
The young Montagues,
 nervous at the treat-
ment their father is receiv-
ing, withdraw.

47
"Await me here. I will
summon the coach."

48
It was an act of great 
 daring for Holden even
to speak to one so far above
him in station as Nancy
Montague.

49
"Miss Montague, I long to
ask your pardon for the
verses I sent you."

50
"They were exceedingly 
bold, sir."

51
"But did have an agree-
able flavor."

52
Virginia voted sympathy for
the colony of Massachusetts,
and appointed a day of
penance and prayer in her
behalf, still none dreaming of 
separation from the Mother 
         Country.

53
"I shall not listen to that
   treasonable document."

54
The little Tory had slight
  knowledge of politics,
but always her father's 
enemies were her own.

55
"Express - Boston!"

56
"Deliver this to your committee 
of Public Safety."

57
Threatening clouds of 
  war.
      ______

The parting of old
friends.

58
"Good bye, George - though
we walk different paths,
pray God that our old friend-
ship shall endure."

59
"Good bye, Miss Nancy."

60
"Charles, you are the son 
of an honourable father
- do your duty - but
do it as you see it."

61
Montague goes North to confer
   with General Gage and
Governor Carleton of Canada, and
to organize friends of the King
against the threatened rebellion -
also, to win the great Indian 
forces to the British cause.

62
Sir Ashley Montague,
  brother of the Vir-
ginia Montague, in his
home in Northern New
York.

63
Sir Ashley Montague
 sometimes jests with
the old shoemaker.

64
"Indians pow-wowin' - -
gettin' too excitin' 'round
here - I'm goin' South."

65
Nearby - the council fires of
the great Indian Confederacy

66
Captain Walter Butler, a deputy
for the King's Superintendent of 
Indian Affairs, requests that the 
Indians side with the King
against the Americans in the
      threatened war.

67
Sachems of The Long
 House assures Cap-
tain Butler of their
    friendship.

68
The war chiefs'
solemn pledge.

69
Walter Butler at his hunting
  lodge. Though American 
born, he was America's 
bitterest foe.

70
Walter Butler, foreseeing the 
  threatened war, dreams of an
opportunity through which he
may become leader, betray his
King, and over the ruins of his 
country establish a new empire
with himself as Viceroy.

71
"Follow me, for a new
empire and a new
world!"

72
Captain Butler leaves for Boston
to confer with General Gage
concerning the use of thousand
of savage warriors.

73
Sir Ashley Montague
wishes him Godspeed.

74
Boston.

75
The Montagues arrive at
 the headquarters of
the British Commander,
General Gage.

76
Nathan had read in the
 "Boston Gazette" all
about the Montagues'
    arrival - -

77
Captain Butler arrives
  in Boston.

78
"Captain Walter Butler."

79
"I promise you absolutely that
the warriors of the Six Nations
will remain loyal to the King."

80
"The King, your Father
across the sea, sends his
greetings."

81
"The impudence of your 
Massachusetts rebels is
unbelievable."

82
"Softly, my dear sir! Let
us first use diplomacy."

83
"The gallows, the bayonet,
or this - -"

84
"- that is the diplomacy 
to use on the American 
rebels."

85
"Pardon my zeal, your
Excellency."

86
A little assembly at General 
Gage's. At the first sight of 
Nancy, Butler determined to 
add her to his conquests.

87
Butler finds an oppor-
  tune moment.

88
"Since I first beheld you,
I have loved - for the
first time ever in my 
life."

89
Nancy is moved by Butler's
picturesque story of his lone-
liness.

90
The Committee of Public 
 Safety - news of a war-
rant to arrest the Rebel
leaders, Hancock and Adams,
as traitors against the King.

91
"We shall be sent to 
ENGLAND for trial!"

92
"For Englishmen, because they
live in America, are no longer
considered fit to sit in trial
upon fellow Englishmen."

93
Hancock and Adams flee to
  Lexington, where the
Minute Men determine to
protect them with their lives.

94
The Montague family, bound for
Canada over the old Mohawk 
trail, also arrive in Lexington on
the fateful night of April 18th,
1775, -

95
- little dreaming of the 
impending disaster which 
is to change their fate
forever.

96
Montague enraged at the sight
of the rebels under arms.

97
One of them has trouble 
 in catching the air of
a new song called "Yankee
Doodle."

98
Nathan has discovered 
 that the Montagues
are stopping for the night
at Lexington.

99
"If you expect me to read 
 your love verses, you
must not fight against my
King."

100
"Torry, or no Torry! King, or
no King! I love you - and
shall until I die!"

101
Later - -

102
"Like it 'round these 
parts - nice and quiet."

103
"Ladies - they bother
me, too."

104
Ended - their last
  game.

105
Reported that the British 
troops are preparing to
seize the arms and ammunition 
at Concord, and to arrest
Hancock and Adams.

106
"Send for Paul Revere."

107
To keep out witches!

108
"Just one word of
farewell!"

109
"The memory of you as
I first saw you will live
with me until I die."

110
"I swear to you, sir, I 
meant no harm."

111
"You scoundrel! No harm
in attempting to enter a 
girl's bedroom?"

112
"This common farmer - this
scoundrel of a rebel, comes
here to dishonor your sister."

113
"Explanations are quickest
   made with a pair o'
       pistols."

114
"Father, he was not in
 the room; he just -"

115
While on the Charlestown Shore,
across from Boston, their fate -
and the Nation's - trembles.

116
Paul Revere prepares 
to carry the message
of alarm.

117
The old North Church -
arranging the signal.

118
The signal for the 
 British march shall
be - One, if by land;
Two, if by sea.

119
The Midnight Ride of
  Paul Revere.

120
Two Regulars posted to
  intercept American 
messengers.

121
"To arms - to arms -
the Regulars are coming!"

122
"The fate of a nation was
riding that night!"

123
"TO ARMS! TO ARMS!!"

124
The Minute Men gather
  in defense of their
liberty - - the Spirit of
America!

125
"My sister's honor - how dare 
you address a Montague!"

126
"TO ARMS!"

127
"ONE!"

128
Lexington.

129
"TO ARMS! THE BRITISH
ARE COMING!!"

130
But the Great Call -

131
Hancock and Adams 
  warned.

132
"Why, the fools mean to
resist His Majesty's
Regulars!"

133
The Regulars!

134
The roll call of the
  Minute Men.

135
"Major Pitcairn is safely 
on the way, sir."

136
Dawn!

137
By the blood of their 
ancestors, 77 resolute sons
of England bar the way
of 800 British Regulars.

138
Nathan also -

139
Parker, Captain of the
  Minute Men.

140
"Disperse, ye rebels -
Lay down your arms, 
and disperse!"

141
"Stand your ground! If
they mean to have a 
war, let it begin here."

142
Nathan's friend, Jonas
  Parker, had sworn
he would never run from 
a Regular.

143
After a warning volley,
the accidental shot that
     began the war.

144
Oh, Spirit of
 Washington!

145
"Charles, where are
you?"

146
"Whatever side you fight 
on, I - I'll love you -
forever."

147
Nathan rides to warn 
his friends at Concord.

148
"Oh, there is nothing to
fear - these rebels will
not fight."

149
Hiding the military
 stores at Concord.

150
Concord Bridge.

151
Nathan arrives.

152
"We ran from them this 
morning - but we run
no more."

153
"Leave hands off that
bridge!"

154
The Shot heard 'round
  the World!

155
The Regulars retreat 
  from Concord.

156
"Where is my son - find
him - find him!"

157
But his son was very 
  busy in the Rebel 
ranks.

158
Nathan sent back to 
 rally the Minute Men
and punish the Regulars
at Lexington.

159
"What have you rebels 
done with my son?"

160
"Lay down your arms!
You traitors - - You
rebels!"

161
"Go into the house,
Mr. Montague."

162
"That - - that farmer
fired on me."

163
"I didn't - I didn't."

164
"Nathan - find him."

165
"You - you have killed 
my father - you rebel!"

166
After the battle -

167
"They - they cut us 
to pieces!"

168
Butler dreams a dream 
of autocratic power -

169
Charles could no longer 
  be true to England
without being disloyal to
America, his birthplace.

170
"It would kill father if he
knew you were going to
fight against the King."

171
 "I am not fighting the
  King - I am fighting
injustice - it is my duty."

172
"Things gettin' too excitin'
'round here - I'm goin'
North."

173
Bunker Hill, from
  Boston Harbor.

174
The redoubt.

175
"Hold your fire until you
see the whites of their 
eyes!"

176
"FIRE!"

177
Volunteers to replenish
 the supply of powder.

178
For the cause - -
 Montague dares!

179
His boy's letters written
  while at school.

180
"I know my boy is 
fighting for his
King."

181
Despite tremendous losses,
with their usual dogged
bravery, again and again
they tried until the last
         time -

182
Driven but not beaten -
 who shall lead them?

183
In Philadelphia, at the
 Continental Congress -

184
George Washington appointed
Commander-in-Chief of the
American Army.

185
A shelter for wounded
  Rebels.

186
"Good-bye - - Mother will
be waiting for you."

187
He had heard of his 
 son's death, and 
demanded to see him
again for the last time.

188
The daughter, afraid of
 fatal consequences, if
he knew his only son had
  fought for the Rebel 
        cause -

189
And then - -

190
It was such sacrifices as
  these that made pos-
sible the momentous event
of the Fourth of July,
1776!

191
The signing of the Decla-
 ration of Independence
- the beginning of a new
English speaking nation.

192
The bell of liberty - -
 tolling for freedom!

193
It was on the Northern frontier
 that the King's forces made a
tremendous effort to split America 
in two, and to join Canada with
New York. Here they combined
the Tories and the Indians to de-
stroy the great grain regions,
without which Washington's army
    would be starved into 
          submission.

194
Fort Esperance, usually called
Fort Sacrifice, in the Mohawk
Valley, - the massacres that
occured here are but examples
of similar events from Canada 
to the Gulf, in which thou-
sands were sacrificed that
   Freedom might live.

195
Under a flag, Montague
escapes to his brother's
home in Northern New 
York.

196
Sir Ashley Montague's
 vast estate was used
as a rendezvous for 
Indians and Tory Sym-
pathizers.

197
Walter Butler's forces on the 
   way to Oriskany.  His
magnetism and real ability had
gathered an army of malcontents
from American territory, uni-
formed as "Butler's Greens".

198
     Walter Butler visits 
         Ashley Court.

Note: At an affair given in Quebec,
after the Cherry Valley massacres,
British Officers of the Regular Army
refused to take the hand of this 
renegade.

199
The scourge of the North
Country was Walter Butler,
a renegade American, who
spared neither age nor sex.
In this one section alone
twelve thousand farms were
devastated and the land
  drenched with blood.

200
Captain Hare, a Tory - an
American renegade - uses
the excuse of war for his
own personal passions and
         savagery.

201
Captain Hare, enamored 
  of Nancy, makes a
terrible vow.

202
Butler had so far managed
  to deceive the Loyalists
as to his real intentions. Before
the Cherry Valley massacres
few dreamed of his real 
character.

203
"My real purpose was 
to see you."

204
Joseph Brant, who, though a
 Mohawk Indian Chief, was
well educated and had been
received at Court. When he
returned to the warpath, how-
ever, he became a terrible foe.

205
"I know of no man to whom
I had rather give my 
daughter's hand than to
yourself, Captain Butler."

206
At Valley Forge, where the
 Rebels endured tremend-
ous privations for the cause
which they believed to be so 
just.

207
Sometimes -

208
Some were without suffi-
 cient clothing even to
venture from their cabins to 
gather firewood; others - -

209
But at the darkest
  hour!

210
Not even the privations Nathan
endured could still the great
flame for Nancy.

211
Nancy had always dreamed 
 of Nathan as her first 
real love - sometimes it does
strike deep.

212
A wagon needed at the 
hospital camp -

213
In the British House
  of Parliament -

214
Edmund Burke protests against 
the use of savages in the war 
against America. The Duke of 
Richmond and James Fox also 
passionately protest in public
against the use of savages in 
          this war.

215
The King, although now busy
waging other wars in Europe,
was determined to use all
means in his power to subdue
      the Americans.

216
When Washington received the
news of the outrages committed
by Butler and his associates, he
was aroused to one of his tempers 
- unusual, but terrifying.

217
General Morgan, Commander of
Morgan's Riflemen, Washington's
favorite unit, suggests that Captain 
Holden be sent to rid the North
Country of Walter Butler.

218
"The borderland must be 
freed. I regret I can 
spare no more men."

219
On Nathan's breast the
 insignia of the famous
Morgan's Riflemen.

220
"Well, I'm back - nothin'
but fightin' and shootin'
down there."

221
In the Spring - Morgan's 
 Men - Virginia's pride,
under Captain Holden, pro-
vided with clothing and
horses at Albany, patrol the
Northland.

222
While passing Ashley
 Court, Holden ---

223
Nancy learns that a Military
 Court has discovered the 
man responsible for the
wounding of the father, and
   that Nathan has been
         exonerated.

224
"Through these many days, 
bitter with cold, starvation
and death, there has never
been a day that my thoughts
have not been with you."

225
"You know how my
father feels toward 
all rebels."

226
"He has suffered enough,
and shall never suffer
again through me."

227
"Before I go I must see
your father."

228
"It is true you would have noth-
ing to fear from the British
Regulars who fight American
soldiers on the field bravely and
squarely, but this Butler, with his
crew of renegades, is a traitor to
his King as well as common decency."

229
"Mr. Montague, I warn you
not to remain in this house.
The Tories and Indians of
this murderous Butler turn
even on their own people."

230
"Enough, sir - Leave!"

231
"Nevertheless, I am 
doomed to love you
until I die!"

232
A year later - While Holden's
 forces are on the Penn-
sylvania border, Butler
conducts a raid in the vicinity 
of Ashley Court.

233
Supplies for Wash-
 ington's army.

234
Not the least of the many
  sacrifices was that of a
Rebel Lieutenant Boyd of
Morgan's Rifles, who allowed
himself to be cut to pieces
rather than reveal a military 
secret to Butler.

235
Butler, with his crew of
 renegades, raised from
American soil, absolutely dis-
obeyed orders from the far
off War Department in Eng-
land, and went his own way
of depredation and outrage.

236
"Make him tell!"

237
Butler's followers, under
 cover of war, revenged
personal spite and passions
on neighboring enemies.

238
Captain Hare adopts the
practice of the day in 
which certain renegade
Tories painted themselves
like Indians to mask their 
   dreadful cruelty.

239
The Montagues' faith in
 their cause is so shaken
by constant proof of the out-
rages daily committed by
Butler and his men in their
   warfare against the
       Americans -

240
- that they are hardly sur-
prised to see Sir Ashley shot
down when he remonstrates
against the raiding of his 
stables.

241
Northern American head-
 quarters alarmed by
reports that Butler is to
strike the valley.

242
A spy reports that Butler
  is to hold a Council of
War at Ashley Court to
plan the attack.

243
"With our limited forces it is
necessary to find his exact
striking place, or our whole
country may be destroyed."

244
Major Strong and Captain
 Nathan Holden arrive at
Ashley Court to investigate.

245
Butler means to succeed
 where Burgoyne failed,
sweep the country with flame,
and establish his own empire
upon its ashes.

246
"You will bring your 
Mohawks here at
three o'clock, Joseph
Brant."

247
"At three o'clock, 
 Walter Butler."

248
"CAPTAIN Butler, by
your leave!"

249
"Do you believe those idle 
tales concerning me?"

250
"Walter Butler, of the 
Cherry Valley massacres,
is not welcome here."

251
"Arrest that man - he
has turned traitor."

252
"Fear nothing, father, I 
am quite safe."

253
Butler's Council of
 War.

254
"Captain Hare, destroy 
Fort Sacrifice."

255
"Men, women, and children
- this whole pack of Ameri-
can wolves - little wolves
grow to big ones - leave
none to grow."

256
Following his usual cus-
 tom Captain Hare dis-
guises himself in the dress
of the savage.

257
"Warn the Valley!"

258
"Not that door - -
 Butler's men!"

259
"Bring Miss Montague
here."

260
"Wait here until I 
return."

261
"Captain Butler, you wouldn't 
keep me here among all
these terrible people!"

262
"Were you not promised 
to me?"

263
"Don't pray to Him -
for He's - -"

264
"On you depend the lives of 
thousands - women and 
little children. All die if you
fail to warn the Valley."

265
Nathan must sacrifice
 either his country or
his loved one.

266
"Your duty - Washington's
orders - America."

267
"The time is come 
to strike."

268
"My Mohawks say, now
or not at all."

269
"Watch that girl until 
I return."

270
"I'll get the guns."

271
"TO THE FORT - -
BUTLER'S IN THE 
VALLEY!!"

272
Nancy flees to the fort,
 the only refuge for 
people of both sides from
Butler.

273
Butler's forces divide 
  to strike.

274
"They are coming up 
the valley - only a 
few miles away."

275
"For God's sake - that
grain convoy - turn it
back."

276
The escape of the 
  grain convoys.

277
Fleeing for refuge.

278
Captain Hare enraged
 at the news of the
Montagues' escape to the
Fort.

279
Captain Hare attacks the 
lower Valley.

280
They strike Fort
 Sacrifice.

281
"Mount - - to Fort
 Sacrifice!"

282
A courier turns them to help
break Butler's army at
Johnson Hall.

283
The Americans attempt
 to break Butler's army 
at Johnson Hall.

284
"Hold them! Hold
them!!"

285
"Fire low, you -"

286
Now flame the sacri-
 ficial fires!

287
The Riders strike
 the line.

288
"CHARGE"

289
A courier from Washington
 tells that an armistice has
been declared, and peace is
at hand.

290
So Holden taught Montague
 that great hearts raise
themselves above birth or
wealth.

291
The surrender of
  Cornwallis.

292
Washington.

293
Father had fought the 
 making of a Montague 
into a Holden - but had 
lost!

294
Friends of old - again 
 friends, to help solidify
the power of the English
speaking peoples in the work 
of the world.

THE END

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