Amarilly of Clothes-Line Alley

1 
Amarilly Jenkins, a
Debutant of Clothes
Line Alley.
	Mary Pickford.

2
Terry McGowan - who
is "keeping company"
with Amarilly.
	William Scott.

3
Amarilly's mother ....
"maid in Ireland".
	Kate Price.

4
Amarilly's brothers, the 
men who uphold the
honor of the Jenkins
family.

5
Sunday .... soothing syrup
  to Clothes Line Alley.

6
Among the Four Hundred
we find Mrs. David Phillips,
who believes in the Fourteenth 
Commandment - "Thou shalt 
not forget thy pose."
		Ida Waterman.

7
  "Yes - this is the
Athletic Club."

8
  "I wish to speak to my 
nephew, Gordon Phillips.
You will find him in the
- Bible Class."

9
The student,
  Gordon Phillips.
	Norman Kerry.

The "stewdent",
  Johnny Walker.
	Fred Goodwins.

10
  "You naughty boy -
why haven't you been
to see me lately?"

11
  "Terry - I loves
violets."

12
"- so do I!"

13
On Sunday afternoon,
Terry and his "best
girl" - motor!

14
  "Wonder where she
copped that muff!"

15
  "We lost our cat 
last week!"

16
Gordon Phillips'
nightly rendezvous.

17
With Amarilly
 and Terry.

18
  "I'm keeping my eye
on a cradle robber!"

19
"... classy elevators!"

20
  "Pardon me, but I start on
my milk route in an hour,
so PLEASE take that Romeo
stuff - up a couple of
flights!"

21
  "They're the champion
check fumblers of the
world."

22
  "All they needs is a
piccalo to have a Jazz
band."

23
  "Me an' you have been
goin' together for three
years ... an' you ain't ever 
kissed me goodnight."

24
  "I suppose it happens 
in every woman's life ...
shoot!"

25
".... good NIGHT!"

26
  "Shame on ye! Galavantin'
around 'til this hour o' night
- an yer poor, old mother
picturin' ye killed entoirly."

27
And then .... on Monday,
it's back to the week-
day grind.

28
  "Excuse me, Mister -
I think the theayter's
on fire!"

29
Home Sweet Home.

30
  "Gee, Ma - Mrs. Jensen's
got the 'gimmies'!"

31
  "'Gim me this' - 'gim me
these' - 'gim me those'."

32
  "Will you sign this, old 
chap? My guest card has
run out."

33
  "Please don't forget to 
come to my dinner party
tonight. It is in honor of
Colette."

34
  "Sorry, Auntie, but Professor
Haig, the great prohibitionist,
is going to lecture in my
studio tonight, on how to
down - whiskey."

35
  "- an' I can git Amarilly
a job at the Cyclone Cafe
- sellin' cigarettes!"

36
  "There! Wasn't I afther
tellin' ye - the Lord never
closes wan door but he
opens a window!"

37
"Irish turkey!"

38
Dinner - when 
it is "eaten".

39
Supper - when 
it is "et".

40
At the Cyclone
  Cafe.

41
Colette King, a product
of social cold storage,
whom Mrs. Phillips hopes
her nephew will marry.
	Margaret Landis.

42
  "I know why Gordon is
studying so hard these 
days .... it is because of
his interest in you, dear."

43
  "Don't you know a lady
when you sees one?"

44
  "My regular business is
the theatrical perfesshun."

45
  ".... scrub lady at the
Majestic Theayter."

46
"Snitch" McCarthy, whose
tattling causes 99% of
the troubles in Clothes Line
Alley.
		Tom Wilson.

47
  ".... them guys over 
there are tryin' to cop
your Janes."

48
  "Gee, Mister! You was
certainly goin' great - 'til
you ran out of gas."

49
  "For the love o' Mike -
where did ye get it?"

50
  "I just seen that girl
o' yours luggin' home a
highbrow."

51
  "I'm sorry to have 
caused you all this 
trouble."

52
  "That's nothin'! Amarilly's 
always draggin' somethin'
home."

53
  ".... last time it was a
bulldog that went mad
an' bit Flamingus."

54
  "How can I repay you
for your kindness?"

55
  "... shure, an' ye could
give me yer washin'."

56
  "... can't a swell guy 
come up here without 
you askin' for his dirty
shirts?"

57
On the following Monday
morning Amarilly pays
her first visit to Gordon
Phillips' studio.

58
  "What a swell scrap there
must a' been around here
to bust up all this china!"

59
  "Don't breathe it to a
soul, Mrs. Finnegan, but
Amarilly met a dude last
night. She's afther his
washin'!"

60
  "There ain't this much 
dirt in all Clothes Line 
Alley."

61
  "That isn't dirt - it's
atmosphere! And it
cost my Aunt about
ten thousand dollars!"

62
"WOW!!"

63
  "Don't breathe it to a 
soul .... but Amarilly's 
gettin' gay with a dude!"

64
  "You ain't offerin' me
seven plunks a week
just for scrubbin' up
this place?"

65
  "You heard what he
called ye? Don't come
home 'til he takes it 
back."

66
  "I can lick any kid in 
the alley - but I can't 
lick a goat!"

67
  ".... ain't it too bad,
Terry, that Amarilly's
throwed you over!"

68
  "I ain't blamin' you,
Amarilly .... I don't stack 
up against no - Matinay
Idol."

69
  "You ain't tyin' the can
to me, are you, Terry?"

70
  "Only thirteen more pay-
ments - an' then it was
ours .... now I guess you
wants it for another girl."

71
  "- I'm through with
dames!"

72
Every month, at the home 
of Mrs. Phillips there 
meets "The Society for the 
Betterment of Humanity".

73
  "The Alley's quaranteened
with scarlet fever. Last night
me an' the kids bunked 
in the Park."

74
  "Kindness is my Aunt's 
hobby. I'll see if she can't
find a place for you."

75
  " - couldn't you find
some unoccupied room
in the house for this 
child?"

76
  "I'd rather stay here an'
go on with the scrubbin'.
Gran'ma scrubbed ... Ma
scrubs ...."

77
  ".... an' I LIKES
scrubbin'!!"

78
The "Society" - like many
philanthropists, enjoys
charity because it reflects
glory upon the giver.

79
  "... perhaps we can use 
the little girl my nephew 
is bringing here, as one of
our experiments."

80
  "What an interesting 
specimen!"

81
  "Another crack like that
- an' I'll crown her!"

82
  "Let us give her every
opportunity for mental
progression. The experi-
ment will be psychological."

83
  "That dame must 'o
swallowed the diction-
ary!"

84
Mrs. Phillips, to demon-
strate her theory that
environment makes the
woman, plans to introduce
Amarilly as a social equal.

85
  "I don't want to be 
no lady - I want to 
go home!"

86
    Two weeks later.
Mrs. Phillips is ready to
believe that charity should
begin at home - and end
there.

87
  "I'm tryin' so hard to 
make good - for Mrs.
Phillips."

88
  "I never knowed what a 
swell place Clothes Line
Alley was, 'til they took me
away from there. Guess -
'cause it's home."

89
Society always enjoys
- "something different".
Now exhibit A - is Amarilly.

90
  " - - - no use for the
bloomin' doll, but I'll
offer twenty dollars for
a kiss!"

91
" - - - thirty dollars!"

92
" - - - thirty-five!"

93
" - - fifty!"

94
" - - one hundred!"

95
  " - - one hundred
and fifty!"

96
And so - out of the
acorn - there grows
the mighty oak.

97
  "How could you ever 
care for the likes of me?"

98
  "You were right, Terry,
not to go into that place 
of evil. There are no heart-
aches that can justify
a man losing his self
respect."

99
  "Would you disgrace your
family name and destroy
your social position - by
such a marriage?"

100
Mrs. Phillips believes,
wisely, that Ridicule is
the antidote of Romance.

101
  "I have asked your 
mother to come to our
tea this afternoon."

102
  "Timmy Murphy .....
so this where ye are 
workin'!"

103
  "Gee, Ma - you're
all dressed up like a
broken arm."

104
  "Meet Bud an' Bo -
the near twins."

105
  "Meet Milt an' Flamingus.
Only been licked onct - an'
that by the Kelly Gang."

106
  " - - an' pipe the Pride
of Clothes Line Alley!"

107
And there follows the
Battle of Iconoclasts
- Round one!

108
  "You ought to see my
mother dance!"

109
  "Some stepper - my
Ma - an' she ain't had 
a lesson!"

110
Round two!

111
  "Wait 'til I springs this
on the Finnegans!"

112
  "I am sorry, Gordon,
that you should be so 
humiliated."

113
Round three!

114
  "Shure, he's a foine
bye, but he's got the
bit o' a cold."

115
  "So has my poor 
little Oswald."

116
  "Oh! You've got a
little bye, too?"

117
  "I don't know if enny of
youse ever took in washin'
- but my - ain't the soap
high!"

118
  "How dare that woman
insult me by speaking of 
my past?"

119
  "I'm sorry my poor Ma
hurt the lady's feelin's.
She didn't mean it -"

120
  "Please forgive her
..... she's just - old
fashioned."

121
  "My dears, this is our
reward for trying to raise
the unfortunates of the 
slums to a higher social
plane."

122
  "Cheer up, Ma .....
it'll all come out in 
the wash!"

123
But for every tear,
there is a laugh
in Irish hearts.

124
  "What's the matter,
Amarilly. Did the
Boiled Shirt croak?"

125
  "That's right ....
strike me!"

126
  "Ma's goin' to the Murphy
weddin' tonight. Come on
over for supper?"

127
  "Just try an' keep me
from comin'!"

128
  "Remember that kiss
I promised you?"

129
  "Well - I've still
got it!"

130
A direct route to any
man's heart.

131
  "I am sorry for what 
happened this after-
noon."

132
  "If you will only give 
me a chance to educate 
you - to take you away
from - all this."

133
  "I'm sorry, Mr. Gordon,
but I knows now that
you can't mix ice-cream
an' -"

134
" - pickles!"

135
  "Gwan, Terry - quit
your kiddin'."

136
The drama ended -
we approach the
eternal triangle - boy,
girl, love.

137
  "When you're well -
we've a fine job for you
- at the City Hall."

138
The epilogue.
Five years later!!!

139
" - s'matter, Pop?"

THE END

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